Single and ready to mingle

Introduction:

These are two activities to talk about dating. Students define the phrasal verbs and tell each other what emotions they associate with them and then do the speaking activity with their classmates.

Level: B1+

Time: 60 minutes

Objectives:

  1. To increase familiarity and correct use of phrasal verbs related to dating.
  2. To provide definitions of the phrasal verbs.
  3. To answer questions about dating using the phrasal verbs in question.

Materials:

  1. Single and ready to mingle Worksheet, one per student.
  2. Single and ready to mingle board game, one per pair or a group of three.

Procedure:

  1. Elicit the best places to find a date from students and write them on the board, e.g. online, at a bar, in a park, in a fitness club, etc., and in pairs ask them to briefly discuss what are the advantages and disadvantages of meeting a potential date in those places.
  2. Hand out a copy of ‘Single and ready to mingle’ Worksheet and ask students to individually complete the table in Exercise 1.
  3. When the students have finished, ask them to mingle with other students to compare and check their answers, and compare the emotions they associate with each verb, e.g. asking someone out fills me with a sense of dread.
  4. Check together as a class.
  5. Put the students in pairs, or groups of 3, and give them a copy of ‘Single and ready to mingle’ board game and a die.
  6. Players take it in turns to throw the die twice – the first throw indicates which column they should use, and the second throw indicates which row, to obtain the question.
  7. Both players must discuss the question in as much detail as possible.
  8. During the game the players must try and incorporate ALL the phrasal verbs into theirs answers.
  9. At the end, ask the students to name three things they have strongly agreed on, or disagreed on, with their classmates.

Fast finishers:

  1. Ask students to think of a single friend they have and write down a list of 5 dating tips for that particular person, e.g. they should be more open- minded and go out more.

Related posts:

Lovers’ tiff

A piece of cake or a hard nut to crack?

Introduction: 

This is a categorising activity and a Find Someone Who speaking exercise to practise 12 phrasal verbs related to eating. Yum yum!

Level: B1

Time: 45 minutes

Objectives:

  1. To present students with 12 phrasal verbs related to eating.
  2. To categorise the phrasal verbs according to students’ own preferences.
  3. To interview other classmates and find those who have a certain characteristic.

Materials:

  1. Phrasal verbs_ A piece of cake or a hard nut to crack? Worksheet, one per student.
  2. Find Someone Who… A piece of cake or a hard nut to crack? Worksheet, one per student.

Procedure:

  1. In groups, ask the students to talk about the meal they had last night; monitor and elicit phrasal verbs related to eating and food, e.g. to eat out, to heat up, etc. and write them on the board. Clarify meaning.
  2. Hand out a copy of Phrasal verbs_ A piece of cake or a hard nut to crack? Worksheet to each student.
  3. Individually, students must divide the expressions into the three separate categories.
  4. When the students have finished, they compare their lists and explain their choices to their partners.
  5. Hand out a copy of Find Someone Who… A piece of cake or a hard nut to crack? Worksheet to each student.
  6. Students must mingle, asking each other about the statements on the worksheet. When they find someone who does the action explained by the phrasal verb, they write their name in the box, e.g.: Student A (Clara): Did you ever pick at your food when you were a child? Student B (Sergio): Well, to be honest, I only ever picked at the overcooked cabbage my grandmother used to prepare. Clara then writes Sergio’s name in that box.
  7. Students are not to discuss more than two statements with each classmate; monitor to make sure all the students speak with each other.
  8. When the students have spoken with everyone in their class and their worksheets are completed, ask them to share the most interesting views, either in groups of three or with the rest of the class.

Fast finishers:

Students attribute a specific food to each phrasal verb that is true for them in order to personalise the activity, e.g. I only have lobster when I eat out, I wolf down cornflakes, etc. The meaning can be further cemented by asking students to write a synonym for each new phrasal verb they have learnt during the activity.

Phrasal verbs. A piece of cake or a hard nut to crack

Find Someone Who… A piece of cake or a hard nut to crack

Related posts:

Hit the road

Hit the road

20170322_122946Introduction: 

These are activities for intermediate students to review travel related phrasal verbs. Students write their own definitions of the phrasal verbs and answer related questions in pairs or groups.

Level: B1+

Time: 45 minutes

Objectives:

  1. To review travel related phrasal verbs.
  2. To provide definitions of the travel related phrasal verbs.
  3. To use the phrasal verbs in meaningful context whilst answering questions in pairs or small groups.

Materials:

  1. Hit the road! Worksheet A, one per student.
  2. Hit the road! Worksheet B, one per pair or small group, cut up.

Procedure:

  1. Hand each student Hit the road! Worksheet A.
  2. Individually, students write their own definitions of the 15 phrasal verbs on the list.
  3. When the students have finished, they compare their answers with a partner.
  4. Check the answers and clarify meanings as a class.
  5. Hand each pair, or small group, a complete cut up set of questions from Hit the road! Worksheet B.
  6. In pairs or small groups, students discuss and answer the questions on each of the cards incorporating the phrasal verbs from the questions into their answers.
  7. Ask students to share the most interesting answers they have heard with the rest of the group.

Fast finishers:

Students briefly describe what they are going to do next time they go away for a few days, using as many of the phrasal verbs as possible. The student who manages to include all the verbs into their response wins, e.g. I will set off early to avoid traffic. I will book into a nice hotel by the beach, switch off my phone, kick back and relax.

Hit the road! Worksheet A

Hit the road! Worksheet B

P.S. Kick back and enjoy your holiday Alex.