Can’t stop dishing out idioms

Introduction: 

These are activities for students to introduce and practise furniture & fixture idioms. Students complete the sentences with the missing words, decide if the definitions of the idioms are correct and do a Find someone who activity with their classmates.

Level: C1

Time: 60 minutes

Objectives:

  1. To introduce furniture & fixture idioms.
  2. To complete the sentences with the missing words.
  3. To decide if the definitions of the idioms are correct or incorrect.
  4. To interview other students and try to get answers to as many questions as possible.

Materials (Click on the worksheet below to download the PDF file):

  1. Can_t stop dishing out idioms Worksheet, one per student.

Procedure:

  1. Write down the missing words from Exercise 1 on the board and in pairs ask students to tell each other if they know any idioms containing those words.
  2. Elicit some answers from the students.
  3. Hand the students Can’t stop dishing out idioms Worksheet.
  4. Individually, students try to complete the sentences in Exercise 1 with the missing words.
  5. When the students have finished, they compare their answers with a partner.
  6. Check the answers as a class.
  7. Now, individually again, the students decide if the definitions of the idioms in Exercise 1 are correct or incorrect (T = true, F= false).
  8. When they have finished, ask them to compare with their partner.
  9. Check the answers as a class.
  10. Next, using the bottom half of the worksheet (Exercise 2), students mingle asking questions and trying to get affirmative answers from their classmates, e.g. Is your sister a couch potato? If the other student says ‘yes’ they have to justify their answer to the interviewer and give an example or two, e.g. She spends 23 hours out of 24 on the sofa. She never does any exercise. Allow no more than 3 minutes for each interview. When the time is up ask students to switch partners.
  11. When the students have had a chance to ask everyone’s opinion, ask them how many affirmative answers they managed to get and which answers surprised them the most.

Fast finishers:

  1. Ask students to describe their ideal partner using at least 5 of the idioms studied, e.g. My ideal partner would have a memory like a sieve and quickly forget if I did or said something he didn’t like.

Related posts:

There is no place like…school

You make my heart BEET 😉

Somewhere over the rainbow 

It’s game time

Zzz

Nothing changes if nothing changes

The proof is in the pudding

A piece of cake or a hard nut to crack?

Introduction: 

This is a categorising activity and a Find Someone Who speaking exercise to practise 12 phrasal verbs related to eating. Yum yum!

Level: B1

Time: 45 minutes

Objectives:

  1. To present students with 12 phrasal verbs related to eating.
  2. To categorise the phrasal verbs according to students’ own preferences.
  3. To interview other classmates and find those who have a certain characteristic.

Materials:

  1. Phrasal verbs_ A piece of cake or a hard nut to crack? Worksheet, one per student.
  2. Find Someone Who… A piece of cake or a hard nut to crack? Worksheet, one per student.

Procedure:

  1. In groups, ask the students to talk about the meal they had last night; monitor and elicit phrasal verbs related to eating and food, e.g. to eat out, to heat up, etc. and write them on the board. Clarify meaning.
  2. Hand out a copy of Phrasal verbs_ A piece of cake or a hard nut to crack? Worksheet to each student.
  3. Individually, students must divide the expressions into the three separate categories.
  4. When the students have finished, they compare their lists and explain their choices to their partners.
  5. Hand out a copy of Find Someone Who… A piece of cake or a hard nut to crack? Worksheet to each student.
  6. Students must mingle, asking each other about the statements on the worksheet. When they find someone who does the action explained by the phrasal verb, they write their name in the box, e.g.: Student A (Clara): Did you ever pick at your food when you were a child? Student B (Sergio): Well, to be honest, I only ever picked at the overcooked cabbage my grandmother used to prepare. Clara then writes Sergio’s name in that box.
  7. Students are not to discuss more than two statements with each classmate; monitor to make sure all the students speak with each other.
  8. When the students have spoken with everyone in their class and their worksheets are completed, ask them to share the most interesting views, either in groups of three or with the rest of the class.

Fast finishers:

Students attribute a specific food to each phrasal verb that is true for them in order to personalise the activity, e.g. I only have lobster when I eat out, I wolf down cornflakes, etc. The meaning can be further cemented by asking students to write a synonym for each new phrasal verb they have learnt during the activity.

Phrasal verbs. A piece of cake or a hard nut to crack

Find Someone Who… A piece of cake or a hard nut to crack

Related posts:

Hit the road

What do ya reckon?

Introduction: 

This is a fun Find Someone Who… with a twist activity to practise asking for opinions. It allows students to interact with 6 different classmates and discuss a variety of topics.

Objectives:

  1. To practise asking for opinion using the expressions given.
  2. To find out why students’ classmates agree or disagree with the statements given.
  3. To get other classmates’ opinions on all the statements on the worksheet.

Procedure:

  1. Hand out one worksheet to each student.
  2. Students must mingle with other students, asking about the statements on their lists.
  3. Students must ask a classmate their opinion on the given topic, using one of the expressions at the top of their worksheet. They must then complete the box with the name of that classmate and the reason why they agree or disagree with the statements given e.g.: Student A: I’d be very interested to hear your views on cutlery. Do you think it’s useless? Student B: Well, to be honest, I think it’s a complete waste of money and we should all use our fingers instead.
  4. Students are not to discuss more than two statements with each classmate.
  5. When the students have had a chance to ask everyone’s opinion, ask them to share the most interesting views with the rest of the class.

what-do-ya-reckon-worksheet