I spy with my little eye

Introduction:

This is an activity to introduce and practise idioms with the word EYE. Students first divide the expressions into 3 categories and then answer the questions and discuss their responses with their classmates.

Level: B2

Time: 60 minutes

Objectives:

  1. To increase familiarity and correct use of idioms with the word EYE.
  2. To develop fluency and answer questions containing the target language in pairs.

Materials:

  1. I spy with my little eye Worksheet, one per student.

Procedure:

  1. Hand out a copy of I spy with my little eye Worksheet and ask students to place the sheets of paper in front of them FACE DOWN.
  2. Tell them to, on the word GO, turn over the worksheet, scan the expressions in Exercise 1 and try to, as fast as the can, find the one body part that completes all expressions. My students all loved this mini competition at the start of the class and instantly became very engaged.
  3. Next ask students to complete the idioms with the word EYE or EYES.
  4. Check together as a class.
  5. Ask the students to divide the expressions into three categories, into those that they know well (I could define it with my eyes shut), those they have heard of but have never used (There is more to it than meets the eye), and those they have never come across before (Please open my eyes to it).
  6. When the students have finished, ask them to answer questions in Exercise 2 out of order on a separate piece of paper or in their notebooks and in as LITTLE detail as possible. Tell students to avoid writing just a YES or NO.
  7. When they have finished, ask them to swap their sheets with a partner.
  8. Students now try to identify which answers correspond to which questions.
  9. When the students have finished, ask them to swap the sheets again and check if their classmates were correct.
  10. Next students discuss their answers; with the same classmates they swapped their sheets with, in GREATER detail.
  11. When the students have finished, ask them to share 2 answers that they had in common and 2 that were different.

Fast finishers:

  1. Ask students to draw four expressions they have learnt in class in their notebooks.

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All rise please

Beauty is in the eye of the beholder

Half full or half empty?

 

All hands on deck, kids

Introduction:

This is an activity to introduce and practise transport idioms. Students complete the idioms with the missing words, match the idioms to their definitions, do a few vocabulary games and later interview their classmates.

Level: B2+

Time: 60 minutes

Objectives:

  1. To present students with transport idioms.
  2. To complete the idioms in Exercise 1 with the missing transport words.
  3. To match the idioms to their definitions.
  4. To answer questions containing the target vocabulary in pairs or small groups.

Materials:

  1. All hands on deck, kids Worksheet, one per student.

Procedure:

  1. Ask students to briefly discuss their favourite/ least favourite means of transport.
  2. Hand out a copy of All hands on deck, kids Worksheet and ask students to individually complete the idioms in Exercise 1 with the missing transport words. There are two extra words to make the activity slightly more challenging.
  3. When the students have finished, ask them to compare in small groups and then check together as a class.
  4. Next students match the idioms to their definitions on the right. When the students have finished, ask them to compare in small groups again and then check together as a class.
  5. Clarify meaning if necessary.
  6. Divide the students in small groups (2 or 3 students in each group).
  7. One student from each group draws one of the expressions on the board and the players from the other teams try to guess what the expression is. Each team only has two opportunities to guess. Ensure ALL the students have had an opportunity to draw an idiom (you might have to do 2 or 3 rounds depending on the number of students on each team). Each team receives 1 point for a correctly identified expression.
  8. Next, the students take it in turns to act out the expressions silently, with the players from other teams trying to guess the idiom.
  9. Then, the students describe the expressions using THREE WORDS only (thank you Alex) but must not use any of the words that are in the expressions.
  10. Finally, in their teams of two or three, ask the students to complete the idioms in Exercise 2. Tell them to fold the paper so they do the exercise from memory. I gave one point to the team who finished first and one point to the team who completed all the idioms correctly.
  11. When the students have finished, ask them to discuss the questions 1-12, Exercise 2 in pairs.

Fast finishers:

  1. Ask students to write down as many expressions as they can remember without looking at the paper.

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Ups and downs

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Beauty is in the eye of the beholder

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Money Money Money

Introduction: 

These are activities to introduce and practise phrasal verbs related to money. Students match the phrasal verbs to their definitions and play a board game.

Level: B2

Time: 70 minutes

Objectives:

  1. To introduce phrasal verbs related to money.
  2. To try and define the phrasal verbs using the context provided.
  3. To match the phrasal verbs to their definitions.
  4. To answer and ask questions about money whilst playing a board game.

Materials (Click on the worksheets below to download the PDF files):

  1. Money Money Money Worksheet and Board game, one per student.

Procedure

  1. Write ‘“Money often costs too much” Ralph Waldo Emersonon the boardAsk students to discuss the quote in pairs and give examples from their own lives, books, films etc.
  2. Hand the students Money Money Money Worksheet.
  3. In pairs, students try to first define the phrasal verbs (in bold) without looking at the definitions. Monitor and encourage students to keep trying but do not give them correct answers at this stage. The majority of my students managed to get 80% of the answers right, just from context.
  4. Individually, students match the definitions (a-l) of the phrasal verbs in sentences 1 to 12 and write them down in the spaces provided.
  5. When the students have finished, they compare their answers with a partner.
  6. Check the answers as a class.
  7. Next put the students in groups of 2 or 3, and give them a copy of Money Money Money board game and a die.
  8. Players must first complete the empty squares with phrasal verbs. Each player describes a situation with a particular phrasal verb in mind but without using the phrasal verb itself, e.g. Last week I went shopping and I spent a huge amount of money in Lush and Body Shop. I just couldn’t resist all those deliciously smelling potions and concoctions. When the other student(s) guess the phrasal verb is splash out they all write it down in the same square. Students continue until they have filled in all the squares. It’s a great way to start recycling vocabulary and personalising the activity straight away.
  9. Now players take it in turns to throw the die twice – the first throw indicates which column they should use, and the second throw indicates which row, to obtain the question /phrasal verb.
  10. When a player lands on a square all three players must answer the question from that square in as much detail as possible. Encourage students to ask each other additional questions to obtain more information. When a player lands on a square with a phrasal verb they must use it to form a question for their partner(s), e.g. Have you ever been ripped off?
  11. The game continues in the circle going left.
  12. At the end, ask students what they found out about their classmates.

Fast finishers:

  1. Ask students to write down some money tips/ financial advice for other students using the phrasal verbs studied, e.g.  Make sure you put some money aside each month.

P.S. Happy Birthday Queen B. I love you.

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Make no mistake

Introduction:

This is an activity for B1 students to review some of the most common mistakes they make. The students correct the mistakes in pairs and then answer would you rather questions.

Level: B1

Time: 45 minutes

Objectives:

  1. To identify and correct common mistakes made by B1 students.
  2. To answer fun/bizarre would you rather questions to make the activity more memorable and fun.

Materials (Click on the worksheet below to download the PDF file):

  1. Make no mistake Worksheet, one per student.

Procedure:

  1. Give each student a Make no mistake Worksheet and in pairs, or groups of three, ask them to correct the mistakes in questions 1 to 20.
  2. When the students have finished, check together as a class.
  3. In pairs, or groups of three, students now answer the questions 1 to 20. Tell students to justify their answers and monitor closely as students often make the same mistakes they have just corrected when they answer the questions, so remind them to pay attention to HOW they respond and not only to WHAT they say.

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P.S. Thank you Alex.

Correct me if I am wrong

Introduction:

This is an activity for B1 students to review some of the most common mistakes they make. The students correct the mistakes individually and in pairs try to guess if the sentences are true or false for the teacher. I have used examples that are true and false for me but feel free to modify and personalise the sentences to make it more relevant for you and your group. I have created this activity based on the mistakes my Spanish students made in one of their speaking activities.

Level: B1

Time: 45 minutes

Objectives:

  1. To identify and correct common mistakes made by B1 students.
  2. To guess if the sentences are true or false for the teacher (Karolina), which makes the activity more engaging and personal both for the students and the teacher.

Materials (Click on the worksheet below to download the PDF file):

  1. Correct me if I am wrong Worksheet, one per student.

Procedure:

  1. Give each student a Correct me if I am wrong worksheet and in pairs, or groups of three, ask them to correct the mistakes in sentences 1 to 16.
  2. When the students have finished, check together as a class.
  3. In pairs, or group of three, again students must decide if the sentences are true or false for the teacher and write their answers in full sentences in their notebooks, e.g. We think Karolina has lived in Madrid since 2011’ or ‘We don’t think she has lived in Madrid since 2011. We think she has lived here since 2009 because she has been teaching here for the last 10 years.’ Encourage students to come up with reasons for their answers to maximize speaking/writing time.
  4. Check together as a class and give each pair / group one point for each correct answer.
  5. In the same pairs, or groups of three, ask students to write a mix of true and false sentences about themselves using the structures / expressions from sentences 1-16 and then ask their partners to guess which are true / false and justify their answers.

Related posts:

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Half full or half empty?

Introduction: 

This is a board game to introduce and practise idioms and phrases related to happiness and misery. Students divide the idioms into two categories: jumping for joy and running on empty (sad) and answer questions about happiness using the new idioms.

Level: B2

Time: 60 minutes

Objectives:

  1. To introduce idioms related to happiness and misery.
  2. To divide the idioms into happy and not so much.
  3. To answer and ask questions about happiness and misery whilst playing a board game.

Materials (Click on the worksheet below to download the PDF file):

  1. Half full or half empty board game, one per group.

Procedure:

  1. Ask students to briefly discuss in pairs whether they consider themselves to be positive or negative people and give examples from their own life.
  2. Next write the following idioms and phrases on the board:
  • To be a bundle of joy
  • To be happy as a clam
  • To be in bits
  • To be on cloud nine
  • To be reduced to tears
  • To be walking on air
  • To feel like a dog with two tails
  • To have a face like a wet weekend
  • To have a whale of a time
  • To have the blues
  • To mope around
  • To take something hard
  1. In pairs ask students to divide the idioms above into two categories: jumping for joy (happy) and running on empty (sad).
  2. Check together as a class and make sure students know the meaning of each idiom.
  3. Put the students in groups of 2 or 3, and give them a copy of Half full or half empty board game and a die.
  4. Now ask the players to write down the “happy” idioms in the orange squares (orange supposedly evokes feelings of happiness, optimism and energy) and “unhappy “idioms in the blue squares (said to express sadness, but can also be calming and soothing so not all hope is lost).
  5. Players take it in turns to throw the die twice – the first throw indicates which column they should use, and the second throw indicates which row, to obtain the question.
  6. When a player lands on a square they must answer the question from that square in as much detail as possible AND using two idioms (they can choose from either the idioms in the same row or the same column). Encourage students to ask each other additional questions to obtain more information. When a player lands on a square with an idiom they must use it to form a question for their partner(s), e.g. Do you always have a whale of a time when you go out with your friends?
  7. The game continues in the circle going left.
  8. At the end, ask students what they found out about their classmates.

Fast finishers:

Give students the scrambled up idioms and ask them to unscramble them from memory:

  • A time have of a whale to
  • Like to with tails feel two a dog
  • Of a joy be bundle to
  • To clam be as happy a
  • To hard something take
  • To weekend face like a wet have a

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Keep up the good work

Introduction: 

These are activities to introduce and practise phrasal verbs related to work. Students match the phrasal verbs to their definitions and play a board game.

Level: B2

Time: 60 minutes

Objectives:

  1. To introduce phrasal verbs related to work.
  2. To match the phrasal verbs to their definitions.
  3. To answer and ask questions about work whilst playing a board game.

Materials (Click on the worksheets below to download the PDF files):

  1. Keep up the good work Worksheet, one per student.
  2. Keep up the good work board game, one per group.

Procedure

  1. Write ‘ “Work is the key to success and hard work can help you accomplish anything” Vince Lombardi on the boardAsk students to discuss the quote in pairs and give examples from their own lives.
  2. Hand the students Keep up the good work Worksheet.
  3. Individually, students write down the definitions (a-l) of the phrasal verbs in sentences 1 to 12 in the spaces provided. You could also ask students to first try and define the phrasal verbs without looking at the definitions.
  4. When the students have finished, they compare their answers with a partner.
  5. Check the answers as a class.
  6. Next put the students in groups of 2 or 3, and give them a copy of Keep up the good work board game and a die.
  7. Players take it in turns to throw the die twice – the first throw indicates which column they should use, and the second throw indicates which row, to obtain the question /phrasal verb.
  8. When a player lands on a square all three players must answer the question from that square in as much detail as possible. Encourage students to ask each other additional questions to obtain more information. When a player lands on a square with a phrasal verb they must use it to form a question for their partner(s), e.g.  Have you or  anyone you know ever been laid off?
  9. The game continues in the circle going left.
  10. At the end, ask students what they found out about their classmates.

Fast finishers:

  1. Ask students to briefly describe their professional career using at least 5 phrasal verbs they have learnt. Younger students could describe what they would like their future job to look like.

Food for thought:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2R_BKlb_Y8k

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