Can you see the error of your ways?Threequel

Introduction:

This is an activity for (lower) intermediate students to review some of the most common mistakes they make. The students correct the mistakes individually, write sentences that are true for them and interview their partners. The mistakes in the exercise are genuine  mistakes made regularly ;( by my own students.

Level: A2/B1

Time: 60 minutes

Objectives:

  1. To identify and correct common mistakes made by (lower) intermediate students.
  2. To practise changing statements into questions.
  3. To develop fluency and confidence in speaking.

Materials (Click on the worksheet below to download the PDF file):

Procedure:

  1. Write I have 2 childrens on the board and in pairs, or groups, ask students to highlight the error and correct it.
  2. When they have finished, ask them what the error was and underline it on the board. To the right of the sentence, ask them to write gramatically correct sentences that are TRUE for them. e.g. I don’t have any children, I have one child, I have two children etc. Go through them together and clear up any doubts.
  3. Then, in their pairs or individually, ask students to change the statement into a question, e.g. Do you have any children? How many children do you have? Write their examples on the board.
  4. Clarify understanding and explain any incorrect suggestions.
  5. Give each student Can you see the error of your ways threequel… or display it on the screen if you are using Zoom and individually ask students to circle the mistakes in sentences 1 to 30.
  6. When they have finished, check together as a class.
  7. Individually, students then write correct sentences in the second column, making each statement true for them, as per the example ( if you are using Zoom ask students to make notes on a piece of paper and when they are finished copy the examples on the board).
  8. Check together as a class.
  9. Individually, ask students to change the statements from the first column into questions and write them down in the third column, as per the example.
  10. Monitor closely. When they have finished, they check the answers with a partner.
  11. Explain any mistakes on the board.
  12. Then, put students into pairs, or groups of three, and ask them to interview each other using the questions.
  13. If students need more practice, ask them to switch pairs / groups and repeat the process.

Fast finishers:

  1. Ask students to write down 4 things they have learned about their classmates.

Related posts:

Can you see the error of your ways? Sequel

Can you see the error of your ways?

My favourite mistakes card game

Make no mistake

Correct me if I am wrong

Bid it 2 Win it FCE Sentence Auction

Bid it 2 Win it Sentence Auction

To err is human

A trip down memory lane

Introduction:

This is a fun board game to practise asking and answering questions in the past simple tense. Students ask and answer questions about a variety of topics and get points for each correct question.

Level: B1+

Time: 45 minutes

Objectives:

  1. To practise asking questions.
  2. To answer other students’ questions.

Materials:

  1. A trip down memory lane board game and an online dice roller if you are teaching online 😉

Procedure:

  1. Display the game on the screen and put students in pairs or small groups of 3 or 4.
  2. Students take it in turns to throw the dice and move the numbers thrown.
  3. To obtain a verb for the speaking activity students throw the dice twice. The first throw indicates which column they should use, and the second throw which row they should use to obtain the verb.
  4. Next students write down as many questions as possible related to the expression in the square making sure they use the actual verb in some of the questions. You can set the time limit and tell students they will be racing against other teams/students. If the students land on 2:1 (To argue with a friend) they could think of the following questions: When was the last time you argued with a friend? What did you argue about? Did you reach an agreement? Did you cry/get upset/ shout at each other etc.? How long did you argue for? Who started it? etc. Encourage them to start with Who, What, Where, When, Why and How and not just an auxiliary verb. You could take this opportunity to also revise subject and object questions.  A quick reminder: Subject questions (Question word + verb in simple past in this case +object e.g. Who started the argument?). Object questions (Question word +auxiliary verb + subject + main verb e.g. What did you argue about?).
  5. Go through the questions together and award a point for each correct question.
  6. In their groups, the students then answer the questions in as much detail as possible.
  7. The game continues until you run out of steam or are saved by the bell 😉 Just kidding.
  8. At the end, ask students to write down 4 additional questions for their classmates about a topic that sparked their interest the most.

Related posts:

Simply perfect

Double Decker

Best birthday ever

Summary of past or recent events

Ir(regular) Xmas

Soap Opera

What’s with all the questions?

How well do you really know your place of work?

Also have a look at one of my activities that has been published on onestopenglish where students practise forming questions and affirmative or negative sentences whilst using the time expressions typically used with the past simple and present perfect tenses:

http://www.onestopenglish.com/community/lesson-share/winning-lessons/grammar-and-vocabulary/time-expressions/556365.article

P.S. Happy birthday dad 😉

 

What’s with all the questions?

IMG-20141231-WA0009

Introduction:

This is a fun board game activity to practise asking wh- questions and any other grammar points you would currently like to revise or practise with your students, e.g. Subject/object questions and present tenses, etc. Students ask and answer wh- questions about a variety of topics.

Level: A2+

Time: 45 minutes

Objectives:

  1. To practise asking wh- questions.
  2. To develop fluency and confidence in speaking.

Materials:

  1. What’s with all the questions PDF board game and one die per pair, or a small group of 3 or 4.

Procedure:

  1. Print the board game and put students in pairs or small groups of 3 or 4.
  2. Players take it in turns to throw the die and move the numbers thrown.
  3. To obtain a question for the speaking activity students throw the die twice. The first throw indicates which column they should use, and the second throw which row they should use to obtain the topic.
  4. Player 1 must then ask their partner or teammates at least 2 questions on the given topic, beginning with who, what, where, when, why and how, focusing on the recent language point studied, e.g. Where do you usually eat lunch? What do you have for breakfast? for present simple, or Where did you eat lunch when you were at school? What was your favourite food when you were a child? to practise past simple, etc. Increase the level of difficulty depending on the level of your class.
  5. The other player/s then answer the questions in as much detail as possible.
  6. The game continues in a circle going left.
  7. At the end, ask students to write down 4 additional questions for their classmates about a topic that sparked their interest the most.

Related posts:

Summary of past or recent events

How well do you really know your place of work?

P.S. Do you think your students would enjoy this activity? I’d love to know your thoughts.

How well do you really know your place of work?

Introduction:

This is a fun competitive game I played in one of my intermediate business classes. Students who all work together in the same company had a chance to use business related vocabulary in a very practical context and had a lot of fun doing so.

Objectives:

  1. To introduce or revise business related vocabulary.
  2. To write true statements about students’ places of work and their colleagues.
  3. To practise question forms by asking other students questions about their place of work and their colleagues.

Procedure:

  1. Put students in pairs or small groups and give them three categories: departments, duties, and positions.
  2. Ask students to give examples for each category e.g. Department: accounting and finance; Duties: preparing financial statements; Position: accountant. I have pre-prepared a set of cards and you can ask students to add further as necessary, in order to personalise the activity.
  3. Go through the vocabulary as a class to ensure the students understand the language in context.
  4. Divide the class into between 2 – 4 teams depending on numbers.
  5. In their teams, the students produce 10 true statements about their place of work using the vocabulary from the previous exercise, e.g. The accountant has been off sick for the last week; The accounting and finance department is responsible for preparing financial statements, etc.
  6. When the students have finished, the game begins.
  7. The students on the first team must change each of their affirmative statements into a question for the other teams, e.g. What is the accounting and finance department responsible for?
  8. The first team member to raise their hand and correctly answer wins the point for their team.
  9. Once the first team has asked all ten questions, it’s the next team’s turn.
  10. The team with the highest number of points after all the questions have been asked wins.

cards

Summary of past or recent events

Introduction:

This is a speaking activity which allows students to describe the most important things that happened to them in 2016, over the holidays, the last school year etc.

Objectives:

  1. To describe past events using past tenses or recent events using present perfect tenses.
  2. To practise asking wh-questions in authentic communication.

Procedure:

  1. Ask students to write down ten important or memorable things that happened to them in the chosen time period. Make sure they know the events will be discussed in class and are not too personal. You can decrease or increase that number depending on how talkative your class is (I found teenagers usually struggle with ten).
  2. Put students in pairs (student A and student B) or groups of three.
  3. Student A briefly describes the first event on the list. Once student A has finished student B asks additional questions starting with who, whose, what, when, where, why, which, how, how long and how many.
  4. Encourage students to show pictures of the events, if they have any on their phones, to make the activity more relevant.
  5. Students continue until they have each described all the events from their lists.

Alternative ideas:

  1. You could also ask students to come up with a recent summary of events in politics, art, science, etc.
  2. You could use it as a getting- to- know- you activity with students writing a list of “Ten things to know about me “.

Related posts:

Best birthday ever

Time to keep up with the times

Ir(regular) Xmas

Soap Opera