Go Get ‘em tiger!

Introduction:

This is a Go Get ‘em tiger! printable board game for students to revise and practise using some common expressions with GO and GET. The students play a board game and then do a quick test in teams to test their memory.

Level: B1+

Time: 45 minutes

Objectives:

  1. To practise using some common expressions with go and get.
  2. To complete exercises 1 and 2 (Go Get ‘em tiger! Worksheet) using expressions with go and get.

Materials:

  1. Printable Go Get ‘em tiger! board game.
  2. One die per group of 3.
  3. Go Get ‘em tiger! Worksheet

Procedure:

  1. Put the students in groups of 3, and give them a copy of Go Get ‘em tiger! board game and a die.
  2. Players take it in turns to throw the die twice – the first throw indicates which column they should use, and the second throw indicates which row, to obtain the question.
  3. When a player lands on a square they must answer the question from that square. The player has to answer the question using the expression in bold at least 2 times, e.g. I get on quite well with my parents, although I must say it’s my mother I get on better with. We seem to have more things in common.
  4. The game continues in the circle going left.
  5. At the end, ask the students to name three collocations they use on a regular basis and three they have never used before.
  6. Put the students in new teams and hand each team Go Get ‘em tiger!
  7. Students complete the exercises in teams.
  8. The first team to complete the exercises correctly wins. Make sure students don’t look at the board game during the quiz.

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P.S. Thank you for all your help Alex.

Brace yourselves. Phrasal verbs r bk

Introduction:

This is a Brace  yourselves. Phrasal verbs r bk printable board game for students to revise and practise using some common phrasal verbs. The students play a board game and predict what other students would rather do in different situations using the phrasal verbs embedded in the questions.

Level: B2+

Time: 45 minutes

Objectives:

  1. To practise using some common phrasal verbs whilst playing Brace  yourselves. Phrasal verbs r bk board game.
  2. To predict what other students would do in different situations.

Materials:

  1. Printable Brace yourselves. Phrasal verbs r bk board game.
  2. One die per group of 3.
  3. One checker per player.

Procedure:

  1. Put the students in groups of 3, and give them a copy of  Brace  yourselves. Phrasal verbs r bk board game and a die.
  2. Players take it in turns to throw the die twice – the first throw indicates which column they should use, and the second throw indicates which row, to obtain the question.
  3. When Player 1 lands on a square, the other player or players have to predict what he or she would rather do, justifying their predictions. Player 1 must then say which prediction was correct and why.
  4. The game continues in the circle going left.
  5. At the end, ask the students to name three things they predicted correctly and three things they would never have guessed.

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How do you …?

Would you rather…?

Introduction:

This is a free Would you rather…? printable board game for students to get to know each other better or/and to practise speaking for fluency. The game could be used at the beginning of each term/year, when a new student joins the class or as a starter or an activity at the end of the class.

Level: B1+

Time: 45 minutes

Objectives:

  1. To practise speaking for fluency whilst answering Would you rather…? questions.
  2. To learn new things about students’ classmates.

Materials:

  1. Printable Would you rather board game .
  2. One die per group of 2 or 3.
  3. One checker per player.

Procedure:

  1. Put the students in pairs, or groups of 3, and give them a copy of ‘Would you rather…?’ board game and a die.
  2. Players take it in turns to throw the die twice – the first throw indicates which column they should use, and the second throw indicates which row, to obtain the question.
  3. When a player lands on a square, they answer the question from that square. The player has to justify their answer and give examples.
  4. The game continues in the circle going left.
  5. At the end, ask the students to name three things they have strongly agreed on, or disagreed on, with their classmates.

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P.S. Happy St Nicholas Day.

Whodunit

Introduction:

This is a fun creative writing activity to practise making predictions. Students come up with a short crime story, write a description of a crime scene and try to predict who the murderer is in the short stories written by other students.

Level: B1+

Time: 60 minutes

Objectives:

  1. To develop speaking confidence and come up with a short story.
  2. To write a detailed description of  a crime scene.
  3. To confidently and correctly use prediction language to guess who the murderer is based on other students’ descriptions of a crime scene.

Materials:

  1. Whodunit worksheet, one per pair.

Procedure:

  1. In pairs, ask students to discuss and describe their favourite crime series or a detective story.
  2. Write who, why, what, where, when, and how on the board.
  3. In the same pairs ask students to orally come up with a short crime story making sure they answer AT MINIMUM the following questions: Who was killed and why? What happened? Where and when the crime took place and how did the victim die? Encourage students to enrich their story with as many details as possible. You could also brainstorm crime vocabulary at this stage.
  4. When the students have finished, hand each pair a Whodunit worksheet. Still in the same pairs ask the students to describe JUST the crime scene but without revealing who the murderer is and why they committed the crime.
  5. Once the students have finished they swap Whodunit worksheets with another pair.
  6. Students now read the description of the crime scene written by their classmates, and using the expressions given, try to predict who the murderer is and why they committed the crime, e.g. The chances are that Dorothy was killed by her lover’s jealous ex-girlfriend. There is no doubt that Stu killed his business partner over financial differences.  Tell students to underline the expressions to make them more visible.
  7. Students then pass the Whodunit worksheet to the next pair who, without reading what the previous pair wrote, continue making predictions, e.g. It’s likely that Stu poisoned Karolina to claim her life insurance.
  8. Students continue passing their Whodunit worksheet round until each pair in the class have made their predictions.
  9. At the end of the activity, students read the predictions made by other students about their case and decide who came closest to their story.
  10. Ask students to briefly tell the whole story to the rest of the class.

P.S. To a very special Coroner’s Officer who inspired this post. Thank you.

Prepositions? Oh, dear humanity …not again!

Introduction: 

This is a Find Someone Who activity to practise using common adjectives with prepositions which my Spanish students seem to struggle with quite a lot. It allows students to interact with different classmates and discuss a variety of topics.

Level: A2+

Objectives:

  1. To complete sentences with missing prepositions.
  2. To decide if the statements are true for the students themselves.
  3. To get other classmates’ opinions on all the statements on the worksheet.
  4. To give students additional speaking practice using common adjectives with prepositions.

Materials:

  1. Prepositions. Oh, dear humanity …not again! worksheet, one per student.

Procedure:

  1. Hand out one Find Someone Who worksheet to each student.
  2. Individually students complete 15 sentences in the table with the missing prepositions.
  3. When the students have finished, they check the answers with a partner.
  4. Check together as a class.
  5. Individually, ask students to decide if the sentences are true for them and ask them to write their answers down just below the sentences e.g. I am afraid of the dark. You: No, I am not afraid of the dark.  
  6. Next students mingle with other students, asking about the sentences on their worksheet, e.g.  Are you afraid of the dark?
  7. They must then complete the box with the classmate’s answer e.g.: Student A: Are you tired of getting up early? Student B: Well, not really. I start work at 5 in the afternoon so I never wake up before 10. Student A: Lucky you. Classmate: Stuart is not tired of getting up early.
  8. Encourage students to ask for an additional piece of information from each classmate.
  9. When the students have had a chance to ask everyone’s opinion, ask them to share the most interesting views with the rest of the class.

Fast finishers:

  1. Students write down 6 sentences to summarise who agreed or disagreed with the statements, e.g. Alex and I are very excited about our holiday in Cuenca. Stuart and I aren’t fond of waking up early.

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Double Decker

Introduction:

These are two board game activities to answer funny questions using past simple and present perfect. The games can be used together, or separately, depending on the objectives of the lesson.

Level: B1 +

Objectives:

  1. To practise answering When was the last time you…? and Have you ever…? questions.
  2. To develop speaking fluency, whilst revising regular and irregular verbs.
  3. To draw students’ attention to the difference between past simple and present perfect if two games are played in the same lesson.

Materials:

  1. 2 PDF Double Decker board games, one per pair or group of 3; a die per pair or group of 3.

Procedure:

  1. Put the students in pairs, or groups of 3, and give them a copy of one of the board games and a die. Aim to have two board games in use at the same time if you want to concentrate on explaining the differences between the tenses.
  2. Ask the students to look at the infinitives on their board games e.g. To hold a new born baby and in their groups ask them to change each verb into past simple and past participle e.g. to hold, held, held.
  3. Check as a class.
  4. Now players take it in turns to throw the die twice – the first throw indicates which column they should use, and the second throw indicates which row, to obtain the expression.
  5. The player must then ask their classmate a question using the expression on the given square e.g. When was the last time you held a newborn baby? Or Have you ever called someone by the wrong name? The other players answer the question and provide their partner, or other two group members, with as much detail as possible.
  6. The game continues in a circle going left.
  7. Swap the board games after sufficient time to allow two games to be played by each pair or group.
  8. At the end, ask the students to name some surprising and unexpected things they have learnt about their classmates.

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Can you see the error of your ways?

Introduction:

This is an activity for lower intermediate students to review some of the most common mistakes they make. The students correct the mistakes individually, write sentences that are true for them and interview their partners.

Level: A2

Time: 45 minutes

Objectives:

  1. To identify and correct common mistakes made by lower intermediate students.
  2. To practice changing statements into questions.
  3. To develop fluency and confidence in speaking.

Materials:

  1. Can you see the error of your ways worksheet, one per student

Procedure:

  1. On the left hand side of the board, write I have 2 childrens. Explain the sentence is incorrect and in pairs, or groups of three, ask students to highlight the error and correct the sentence, e.g. I don’t have any children, I have 3 children, etc.
  2. When they have finished, ask them what the error was and underline it on the board. To the right of the sentence, ask them to write their correct sentences in a column on the board. Go through them together as a class and ask which statement is true for them – underline it on the board.
  3. Then, in their pairs, ask the students to change the statement from the first column into a question, e.g. Do you have any children? How many children do you have? Write on the board in a column to the right of the correct sentences.
  4. Clarify understanding and explain any incorrect suggestions.
  5. Give each student a Can you see the error of your ways… worksheet and individually ask students to circle the mistakes in sentences 1 to 12.
  6. When they have finished, they check the answers with a partner.
  7. Individually, students then write a correct sentence in the second column, making the statement true for them, as per the example.
  8. When they have finished, they check the answers with a partner.
  9. Individually, ask the students to change the statements from the first column into questions and write them down in the third column, as per the example.
  10. Monitor closely. When they have finished, they check the answers with a partner.
  11. Explain any mistakes on the board using the correct structures.
  12. Then, put students into pairs, or groups of three, and ask them to interview each other using the questions.
  13. If students need more practice, ask them to switch pairs / groups and repeat the process.

Fast finishers:

  1. Ask students to write down 4 things they have learned about their classmates.

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P.S. Thank you Alex.