Prepositions? Oh, dear humanity …not again!

Introduction: 

This is a Find Someone Who activity to practise using common adjectives with prepositions which my Spanish students seem to struggle with quite a lot. It allows students to interact with different classmates and discuss a variety of topics.

Level: A2+

Objectives:

  1. To complete sentences with missing prepositions.
  2. To decide if the statements are true for the students themselves.
  3. To get other classmates’ opinions on all the statements on the worksheet.
  4. To give students additional speaking practice using common adjectives with prepositions.

Materials:

  1. Prepositions. Oh, dear humanity …not again! worksheet, one per student.

Procedure:

  1. Hand out one Find Someone Who worksheet to each student.
  2. Individually students complete 15 sentences in the table with the missing prepositions.
  3. When the students have finished, they check the answers with a partner.
  4. Check together as a class.
  5. Individually, ask students to decide if the sentences are true for them and ask them to write their answers down just below the sentences e.g. I am afraid of the dark. You: No, I am not afraid of the dark.  
  6. Next students mingle with other students, asking about the sentences on their worksheet, e.g.  Are you afraid of the dark?
  7. They must then complete the box with the classmate’s answer e.g.: Student A: Are you tired of getting up early? Student B: Well, not really. I start work at 5 in the afternoon so I never wake up before 10. Student A: Lucky you. Classmate: Stuart is not tired of getting up early.
  8. Encourage students to ask for an additional piece of information from each classmate.
  9. When the students have had a chance to ask everyone’s opinion, ask them to share the most interesting views with the rest of the class.

Fast finishers:

  1. Students write down 6 sentences to summarise who agreed or disagreed with the statements, e.g. Alex and I are very excited about our holiday in Cuenca. Stuart and I aren’t fond of waking up early.

Related posts:

A grand (two-party) coalition of verbs and prepositions

If my memory serves me right…

Ask a Q board game

When & where board game

The search is on (preposition game)

 

A grand (two-party) coalition of verbs and prepositions

 

Introduction: 

These are activities for intermediate students to review common verbs and prepositions. Students write their own examples in the table, compare with their partner and play a competitive card game.

Level: B1

Time: 45 minutes

Objectives:

  1. To review common verbs and prepositions.
  2. To use the verbs and prepositions in context whilst playing a fun card game.

Materials:

  1. A grand (two-party) coalition! Worksheet A, one per student.
  2. A grand (two-party) coalition! Worksheet B, one per pair or small group, cut up.

Procedure:

  1. Hand each student ‘A grand (two-party) coalition! Worksheet A’.
  2. Individually, students write their own examples for the verbs and prepositions in the table, e.g. apply for a job.
  3. When the students have finished, they compare their answers with a partner.
  4. Check the answers and clarify meaning as a class.
  5. Put students in teams of 3 or 4.
  6. Print and cut out the cards from ‘A grand (two-party) coalition! Worksheet B’, one set per group. Shuffle and place all cards face down on the table.
  7. The first player takes a card from the pile and reads what is written on the card, e.g. to apply or for.
  8. All players must now come up with the correct missing preposition or verb and use it correctly in a sentence. Make sure the students write down the sentences to avoid misunderstanding.
  9. The students get 1 point if the sentence is correct and 2 points if the sentence is correct AND they use a different example from the other players, e.g.:
  • He applied for a job in Bath last week. 1 point
  • I would love to apply for a job in Poland. 1 point
  • He applied for a teaching post at Norwich University last year. 2 points 
  1. The player with the highest number of points wins.

A grand (two-party) coalition! Worksheet A

A grand (two-party) coalition! Worksheet B

P.S. Good luck today Alex.

 

 

If my memory serves me right…

Introduction:

This is an activity you can do with students to review ‘there was’ / ‘there were’ and prepositions of place. Students look at a picture for one minute, answer questions from memory and write questions for other students about pictures they have brought to class. The photo on the worksheet is one I took recently on holiday in Croatia and it is just an example. Of course, you can use your own photo and create your own questions.

Level: A2+

Time: 35 minutes

Objectives:

  1. To review ‘there was’ / ‘there were’ structures and prepositions of place.
  2. To write 10 ‘was there’ / ‘were there’ questions using students’ own pictures.
  3. To practise answering questions with the correct structures and prepositions.

Materials:

  1. If my memory serves me right PDF worksheet, one per student.
  2. Teacher’s own photos or magazines.
  3. Students’ own photos or magazines.

Procedure:

  1. Divide the class into groups of three or four. Explain that you are going to show them a picture for 1 minute and that they must memorize as many details as possible for a quiz afterwards (Make sure you have made enough copies of the picture or display it on a TV or projector).
  2. When the minute has passed, nominate someone from each team to be spokesperson and explain that you will only accept the answer given by that person. This encourages discussion and forces the stronger members to be patient. If an answer is shouted out by someone other than a spokesperson, the answer cannot be accepted, and a spokesperson from another team can ‘steal’ the answer.
  3. Ask the 5 questions about the photo (see PDF Worksheet) and award one point for the correct answer.
  4. Explain that the students will now repeat this process, using a picture on their phone or from a magazine that you have provided.
  5. Using the picture, they must write 10 questions that they will use to test other students’ memory, including prepositions of place, e.g. Was the woman in the picture behind or next to the blue car?
  6. When the students have finished, put them in pairs or threes. Taking it in turns, students will show their picture to their classmates for exactly 1 minute, before asking them 10 questions.
  7. Monitor to ensure students answer in full sentences, e.g. No, the woman in the picture was behind the blue car.
  8. Continue until all students have tested and been tested!

 Fast finishers: 

Students imagine their classmates’ picture is a picture of a crime scene and they must describe it to the police in great detail. They write a short description of it from memory and, when finished, show it to their classmates to “correct”.

If my memory serves me right PDF worksheet

Related posts:

The search is on (preposition game)

When & where board game

 

 

 

Ask a Q board game

Introduction:

This is a free printable board game to practise adjectives followed by prepositions and improve fluency under time pressure.

Objective:

The objective of the game is to reach the end by moving across the board whilst asking and answering questions.

Materials:

Printable ASK a Q board game, a die, one checker per player and a countdown timer.

How to play:

  1. Ask a Q is played by 2 to 4 players.
  2. Players take it in turns to throw the die and move the number thrown.
  3. When a player lands on a square they ask the student on their right the question from that square. The student has to speak for at least 45 seconds without excessive repetition, and must answer the question using the adjective and the preposition in bold. If the player repeats or pauses for too long, the timer is restarted and they must start their answer again. After completing the task, they then roll the die and ask the question to the student on their right.
  4. The winner is the first player to land on the last square.

Note: The adjectives and prepositions are in bold to encourage noticing.

ask-a-q-printable-board-game

Related posts:

When & where board game

Compare & contrast board game

Time to keep up with the times

When & where board game

Introduction:

This is a free printable board game to review prepositions of time and place.

Objective:

The objective of the game is to move across the board and reach the end with the highest number of points; points are given for correct use of the prepositions in, at or on.

Materials:

Printable board game, dice and some checkers.

How to play:

  1. When & where is played by 2 to 4 players.
  2. Players take it in turns to throw the dice and move the number thrown.
  3. When the players land on the squares they must create two sentences with the expressions on the square. The players get one point for each correct sentence e.g. if the player rolls a 3 they move 3 spaces on the blue board and think of sentences with the words given : I would love to travel to India in the future, I was at a boring meeting last night. They score 2 points and the next player rolls the dice.
  4. If the player makes a mistake they don’t receive a point for that sentence.
  5. Other players can receive extra points if they spot and correct the other player’s mistake, which encourages peer correction.
  6. The winner is the player who lands on the last square with the highest number of points for correct sentences.

when-where-printable-board-game

P.S. Thank you Alex for your support and constant motivation.

P.S. Thank you Stu for your incredible attention to detail. Feedback taken on board 🙂

Related posts:

Time to keep up with the times

Ask a Q board game

Compare & contrast board game

The search is on (preposition game)

INTRODUCTION:

This game works well if you have a big place available to you. I have done it in a TV company I work in and the summer school I go to every year. This also works within the classroom if you are not able to use a larger space.

OBJECTIVES:

1. To revise / introduce prepositions of place
2. To provide students with an opportunity to practise a grammar point in an entertaining way
3. To encourage pair and group work
4. To encourage peer correction

PROCEDURE:

• Preparation: Before the class put various objects in different areas of the building or classroom where they can be easily seen e.g. a pen on the sofa in the reception area, a folder under the chair next to the main door. To make it more obvious, you could choose items which are all the same colour, or begin with the same letter, or are related to a certain topic.

• In the class, revise prepositions of place e.g. in, at, on, under, above, next to, in front of, behind, opposite.

• Explain to the students that as a group they will be doing a ‘treasure hunt’ of objects around the school and that they must find and correctly describe the location of the object in order to win a point. You can offer guidance by taking them to the vicinity of the items. You could take pictures of the objects you want students to find and show them before you all leave the classroom.

• After you have found all the objects and their locations have been correctly described , return to the classroom and put students in small groups.

• Give each group ( maximum 3 students per group) 10 post- it notes on which they write their team name and number them 1-10.

• Students go and stick the post –it notes in various places throughout the building writing down the exact position of the note on a sheet of paper e.g. Post-it note1 is under the small blue table on the first floor (I encourage the weaker students to write and the stronger to correct and supervise).

• When the groups come back correct any errors in spelling or grammar and the groups swap sheets.

• Now the groups have to find the other teams’ post-it notes as quickly as possible following the instructions written by the other team.

FEEDBACK:

Identify why/if some of the post-it notes couldn’t be located, and correct the sentences with the students.

I find the students become very competitive, engaged, active and on their feet which is a nice change from the typical lesson. They also receive immediate feedback on their work – if their instructions are unclear, the other teams are unable to find the post-it notes.