Do you believe in ghosts?

Introduction: 

This is a board game for B2 students to review common verbs and prepositions. Students answer questions containing the target language and do a couple of recycling activities at the end to further reinforce the vocabulary.

Level: B2

Time: 45 minutes

Objectives:

  1. To review common verbs and prepositions.
  2. To use the verbs and prepositions in context whilst playing a board game.

Materials (Click on the worksheet below to download the PDF file):

  1. Do you believe in ghosts? board game.
  2. One die per group of 3.

Procedure:

  1. Put the students in groups of 3, and give them a copy of Do you believe in ghosts? board game and a die. All the verbs and dependent prepositions are in bold to encourage noticing.
  2. Players take it in turns to throw the die twice – the first throw indicates which column they should use, and the second throw indicates which row, to obtain the question.
  3. When a player lands on a square all three players must answer the question from that square in as much detail as possible. Encourage students to ask each other additional questions to obtain more information.
  4. The game continues in the circle going left.
  5. At the end, ask the students to copy all the verbs and prepositions in alphabetical order in their notebooks and finally circle the verbs they use on a regular basis, underline the ones that were new and tick the expressions they didn’t get to use whilst playing the board game.

Fast finishers:

  1. Ask students to write their own questions with the verbs they didn’t practice whilst playing the board game and interview their classmates.

Related posts:

A grand (two-party) coalition of verbs and prepositions

Blah Blah PET Part 1

Introduction:

This is a short error correction activity and a board game to practise giving personal information about yourself, where you live, your hobbies, your job, etc. as well as to prepare students for Speaking Part 1 of the PET exam.

Level: B1

Objectives:

  1. To raise students’ awareness of some of the most common preposition & article mistakes they make.
  2. To correct mistakes in sentences 1-14 (I can’t believe I said that Worksheet).
  3. To practise giving personal information.
  4. To encourage peer correction.

Materials (Click on the worksheets below to download the PDF files):

  1. I can_t believe I said that Worksheet, one per student.
  2. Blah Blah PET Part 1 board game and a die, one per pair or group of 3.

Procedure:

  1. Give students a copy of I can’t believe I said that Worksheet (This exercise is based on the mistakes my own students made when we did this activity last week).
  2. Individually ask students to correct the mistakes in sentences 1-14. Tell students to concentrate ONLY on the prepositions and articles.
  3. When the students have finished, ask them to check their answers with a classmate. Together they must decide on an answer and agree: this increases talking time and requires repetition of the language.
  4. Check together as a class. The class must decide as a group what they believe the correct answer to be. As teacher, only write their final answers on the board, do not tell them if they are correct or not at this stage. Once they have discussed and agreed on all of their answers as a class, tell them how many (if any) they have wrong – do not tell them which ones are wrong. As a class, they must review all of the questions and decide which one(s) they think is incorrect.
  5. Put the students in pairs or groups of 3 and give them a copy of Blah Blah PET Part 1 board game and a die.
  6. Players take it in turns to throw the die twice – the first throw indicates which column they should use, and the second throw indicates which row, to obtain the question.
  7. The player must then answer the question from that square. Encourage students to give more than just short one or two word answers. Ask the other students to pay CLOSE attention and write down any preposition or article mistakes they think their classmate made.
  8. The game continues in a circle going left.
  9. At the end, ask the students to share if they have noticed any incorrect use of articles and prepositions and go through their notes with the rest of the class.

Related posts:

Can you see the error of your ways?

Bid it 2 Win it FCE Sentence Auction

Bid it 2 Win it Sentence Auction

My favourite mistakes card game

Prepositions? Oh, dear humanity …not again!

Introduction: 

This is a Find Someone Who activity to practise using common adjectives with prepositions which my Spanish students seem to struggle with quite a lot. It allows students to interact with different classmates and discuss a variety of topics.

Level: A2+

Objectives:

  1. To complete sentences with missing prepositions.
  2. To decide if the statements are true for the students themselves.
  3. To get other classmates’ opinions on all the statements on the worksheet.
  4. To give students additional speaking practice using common adjectives with prepositions.

Materials:

  1. Prepositions. Oh, dear humanity …not again! worksheet, one per student.

Procedure:

  1. Hand out one Find Someone Who worksheet to each student.
  2. Individually students complete 15 sentences in the table with the missing prepositions.
  3. When the students have finished, they check the answers with a partner.
  4. Check together as a class.
  5. Individually, ask students to decide if the sentences are true for them and ask them to write their answers down just below the sentences e.g. I am afraid of the dark. You: No, I am not afraid of the dark.  
  6. Next students mingle with other students, asking about the sentences on their worksheet, e.g.  Are you afraid of the dark?
  7. They must then complete the box with the classmate’s answer e.g.: Student A: Are you tired of getting up early? Student B: Well, not really. I start work at 5 in the afternoon so I never wake up before 10. Student A: Lucky you. Classmate: Stuart is not tired of getting up early.
  8. Encourage students to ask for an additional piece of information from each classmate.
  9. When the students have had a chance to ask everyone’s opinion, ask them to share the most interesting views with the rest of the class.

Fast finishers:

  1. Students write down 6 sentences to summarise who agreed or disagreed with the statements, e.g. Alex and I are very excited about our holiday in Cuenca. Stuart and I aren’t fond of waking up early.

Related posts:

A grand (two-party) coalition of verbs and prepositions

If my memory serves me right…

Ask a Q board game

When & where board game

The search is on (preposition game)

 

A grand (two-party) coalition of verbs and prepositions

 

Introduction: 

These are activities for intermediate students to review common verbs and prepositions. Students write their own examples in the table, compare with their partner and play a competitive card game.

Level: B1

Time: 45 minutes

Objectives:

  1. To review common verbs and prepositions.
  2. To use the verbs and prepositions in context whilst playing a fun card game.

Materials:

  1. A grand (two-party) coalition! Worksheet A, one per student.
  2. A grand (two-party) coalition! Worksheet B, one per pair or small group, cut up.

Procedure:

  1. Hand each student ‘A grand (two-party) coalition! Worksheet A’.
  2. Individually, students write their own examples for the verbs and prepositions in the table, e.g. apply for a job.
  3. When the students have finished, they compare their answers with a partner.
  4. Check the answers and clarify meaning as a class.
  5. Put students in teams of 3 or 4.
  6. Print and cut out the cards from ‘A grand (two-party) coalition! Worksheet B’, one set per group. Shuffle and place all cards face down on the table.
  7. The first player takes a card from the pile and reads what is written on the card, e.g. to apply or for.
  8. All players must now come up with the correct missing preposition or verb and use it correctly in a sentence. Make sure the students write down the sentences to avoid misunderstanding.
  9. The students get 1 point if the sentence is correct and 2 points if the sentence is correct AND they use a different example from the other players, e.g.:
  • He applied for a job in Bath last week. 1 point
  • I would love to apply for a job in Poland. 1 point
  • He applied for a teaching post at Norwich University last year. 2 points 
  1. The player with the highest number of points wins.

A grand (two-party) coalition! Worksheet A

A grand (two-party) coalition! Worksheet B

P.S. Good luck today Alex.

 

 

If my memory serves me right…

Introduction:

This is an activity you can do with students to review ‘there was’ / ‘there were’ and prepositions of place. Students look at a picture for one minute, answer questions from memory and write questions for other students about pictures they have brought to class. The photo on the worksheet is one I took recently on holiday in Croatia and it is just an example. Of course, you can use your own photo and create your own questions.

Level: A2+

Time: 35 minutes

Objectives:

  1. To review ‘there was’ / ‘there were’ structures and prepositions of place.
  2. To write 10 ‘was there’ / ‘were there’ questions using students’ own pictures.
  3. To practise answering questions with the correct structures and prepositions.

Materials:

  1. If my memory serves me right PDF worksheet, one per student.
  2. Teacher’s own photos or magazines.
  3. Students’ own photos or magazines.

Procedure:

  1. Divide the class into groups of three or four. Explain that you are going to show them a picture for 1 minute and that they must memorize as many details as possible for a quiz afterwards (Make sure you have made enough copies of the picture or display it on a TV or projector).
  2. When the minute has passed, nominate someone from each team to be spokesperson and explain that you will only accept the answer given by that person. This encourages discussion and forces the stronger members to be patient. If an answer is shouted out by someone other than a spokesperson, the answer cannot be accepted, and a spokesperson from another team can ‘steal’ the answer.
  3. Ask the 5 questions about the photo (see PDF Worksheet) and award one point for the correct answer.
  4. Explain that the students will now repeat this process, using a picture on their phone or from a magazine that you have provided.
  5. Using the picture, they must write 10 questions that they will use to test other students’ memory, including prepositions of place, e.g. Was the woman in the picture behind or next to the blue car?
  6. When the students have finished, put them in pairs or threes. Taking it in turns, students will show their picture to their classmates for exactly 1 minute, before asking them 10 questions.
  7. Monitor to ensure students answer in full sentences, e.g. No, the woman in the picture was behind the blue car.
  8. Continue until all students have tested and been tested!

 Fast finishers: 

Students imagine their classmates’ picture is a picture of a crime scene and they must describe it to the police in great detail. They write a short description of it from memory and, when finished, show it to their classmates to “correct”.

If my memory serves me right PDF worksheet

Related posts:

The search is on (preposition game)

When & where board game

 

 

 

Ask a Q board game

Introduction:

This is a free printable board game to practise adjectives followed by prepositions and improve fluency under time pressure.

Objective:

The objective of the game is to reach the end by moving across the board whilst asking and answering questions.

Materials:

Printable ASK a Q board game, a die, one checker per player and a countdown timer.

How to play:

  1. Ask a Q is played by 2 to 4 players.
  2. Players take it in turns to throw the die and move the number thrown.
  3. When a player lands on a square they ask the student on their right the question from that square. The student has to speak for at least 45 seconds without excessive repetition, and must answer the question using the adjective and the preposition in bold. If the player repeats or pauses for too long, the timer is restarted and they must start their answer again. After completing the task, they then roll the die and ask the question to the student on their right.
  4. The winner is the first player to land on the last square.

Note: The adjectives and prepositions are in bold to encourage noticing.

ask-a-q-printable-board-game

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When & where board game

Compare & contrast board game

Time to keep up with the times

When & where board game

Introduction:

This is a free printable board game to review prepositions of time and place.

Objective:

The objective of the game is to move across the board and reach the end with the highest number of points; points are given for correct use of the prepositions in, at or on.

Materials:

Printable board game, dice and some checkers.

How to play:

  1. When & where is played by 2 to 4 players.
  2. Players take it in turns to throw the dice and move the number thrown.
  3. When the players land on the squares they must create two sentences with the expressions on the square. The players get one point for each correct sentence e.g. if the player rolls a 3 they move 3 spaces on the blue board and think of sentences with the words given : I would love to travel to India in the future, I was at a boring meeting last night. They score 2 points and the next player rolls the dice.
  4. If the player makes a mistake they don’t receive a point for that sentence.
  5. Other players can receive extra points if they spot and correct the other player’s mistake, which encourages peer correction.
  6. The winner is the player who lands on the last square with the highest number of points for correct sentences.

when-where-printable-board-game

P.S. Thank you Alex for your support and constant motivation.

P.S. Thank you Stu for your incredible attention to detail. Feedback taken on board 🙂

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