Two-round boxing match

Introduction:

This is an activity for FCE students to practise the passive and the active voice in a fun and competitive way. Students change the sentences from the active into the passive voice or from the passive into the active voice. The activity could also be used as a warmer or a plenary if the students are already able to use the target language confidently.

Level: B2

Time: 30 minutes

Objectives:

  1. To change the sentences from the active into the passive voice or from the passive into the active voice.
  2. To get a winning line of four noughts or four crosses in either a horizontal, vertical or diagonal row.

Materials (Click on the worksheets below to download the PDF files):

  1. Round One Worksheet, one per pair.
  2. Round Two Worksheet, one per pair.

Procedure:

  1. Divide the students into pairs and hand out a Round One Worksheet to each pair.
  2. The players start with Round One.
  3. Each player takes a turn to change one of the sentences from active into passive voice. If they manage to do it correctly, they add either an O or an X to the board. The first player to line up 4 of their symbols in a row wins. The students must write each answer in the space provided below the table.
  4. Repeat the procedure with Round Two Worksheet.
  5. Monitor at all times and go through some of the most problematic sentences together at the end of the class.

Fast finishers:

  1. Ask students to write 4 sentences in the active voice and 4 in the passive voice using a variety of tenses, e.g. Stuart is going to buy Karolina coffee this afternoon. Karolina was invited to a storytelling event by Brittany. When the students have finished they swap their sentences with their partner and change the eight sentences into active or passive voice.

Related posts:

Noughts and Crosses

P.S. “Never use the passive where you can use the active.” George Orwell

Word Fusion

Introduction: 

This is an activity for intermediate students to practise forming compound nouns. Students form compound nouns, complete the sentences with the missing words and answer another classmate’s questions.

Level: B1

Time: 45 minutes

Objectives:

  1. To combine different words to form compound nouns.
  2. To ask and answer questions containing the compound nouns in question.

Materials (Click on the worksheets below to download the PDF files):

  1. Word fusion Worksheet A or B, one per student.
  2. Word fusion Fast Finisher Worksheet, one per student.

Procedure:

  1. Elicit some common compound nouns from students and write them on the board e.g. jellyfish, board game, eyelid,
  2. Divide the class in half down the middle – one side As, the other side Bs – and hand out the worksheets accordingly.
  3. Individually, students combine the nouns from the table and complete the sentences 1-10 with the newly formed words.
  4. When the students have finished, they compare their answers with another classmate  from their group of As or Bs.
  5. Monitor and check their answers in their groups of A or B.
  6. When the students have finished, put the students into A / B pairs; in turns they ask and answer each other’s questions.
  7. Monitor and encourage students to use the nouns in their answers.
  8. At the end ask students to share three things they agree about with their partner.

Fast finishers: 

  1. Hand out the Word Fusion Fast Finisher Worksheet and in A / B pairs ask students to choose six compounds and complete the table.

P.S. Thank you for your help Stu. Get better soon.

Phrasal verbs can be put off, never forgotten

Introduction:

This is an activity for intermediate + students to review some of the most common phrasal verbs with PUT. Students use context to come up with their own definitions of the ten phrasal verbs, answer the questions and share their examples with other students.

Level: B1 +

Time: 45 minutes

Objectives:

  1. To familiarise students with some of the most common phrasal verbs with put.
  2. To write down definitions of the phrasal verbs using the context provided.
  3. To discuss students’ examples with another classmate.

Materials (Click on the worksheet below to download the PDF file):

  1. Phrasal verbs can be put off, never forgotten Worksheet

Procedure:

  1. Write the following phrasal verbs on the board: to put on, to put through, to put off, to put up with, to put away, to put across to, to put down (to), to put forward.
  2. In pairs ask students to briefly define the phrasal verbs they know or think they remember.
  3. Hand each student the Phrasal verbs can be put off, never forgotten Worksheet.
  4. Individually, students look at the questions in column 2 and complete the first column, e.g. Definition/ synonym: Repel. Name two annoying things people do that really put you off.
  5. In pairs, students compare their answers with a classmate.
  6. Correct and provide feedback.
  7. Individually, ask the students to answer the questions in column 2 with one or two words, e.g. Name two food items that make people put on weight. Your examples: Alcohol. Mince pies.
  8. When the students have finished, ask them to switch their worksheets, read each other’s answers and circle 3 examples they have in common with their classmate, underline 3 examples they want to know more about and cross out 3 examples they completely disagree with.
  9. In their pairs, students now discuss their examples. Encourage students to use the phrasal verbs in their responses. You can ask students to switch pairs again to provide them with more opportunities to practise the target language.

Fast finishers:

  1. Students choose 4 questions from the worksheet and try to predict what the teacher’s answer would be or the classmate’s that they haven’t spoken to, e.g. Name two things you have to put up with at school or at work. Karolina has to put up with Stuart using her printer and talking about Star Wars (Love you really Stu). When they are finished they give their sentences to the teacher/classmate to check if their predictions were correct.

Related posts:

Brace yourselves. Phrasal verbs r bk

Single and ready to mingle

Hit the road

How do you …?

P.S. Procrastinate now. Don’t put it off 🙂

 

Noughts and Crosses

 

Introduction:

This is an activity for PET students to practise Part 1 of the Writing Exam in a fun and competitive way. Students complete the second sentences in bold so that they mean the same as the first. The examples for this exercise are similar to the ones students could find in the PET exams (Writing Part 1).

Level: PET

Time: 45 minutes

Objectives:

  1. To complete the second sentences so that they mean the same as the first.
  2. To get a winning line of four Noughts or four Crosses in either a horizontal, vertical or diagonal row.

Materials:

  1. Noughts and Crosses Worksheet, one per pair.

Procedure:

  1. Divide the students into pairs and hand out a Noughts and Crosses Worksheet to each pair.
  2. Each player takes a turn to complete one of the second sentences in bold to mean the same as the first sentence using no more than three words. If they manage to do it correctly, they add either an O or an X to the board. The first player to line up 4 of their symbols in a row wins.
  3. Monitor at all times and go through some of the most problematic sentences together at the end of the class.

Fast finishers:

  1. Write 4 sentences about yourself using the structures from the sentences in bold, e.g.  I prefer working alone to working with other people. I have eaten a grasshopper before.

Brace yourselves. Phrasal verbs r bk

Introduction:

This is a Brace  yourselves. Phrasal verbs r bk printable board game for students to revise and practise using some common phrasal verbs. The students play a board game and predict what other students would rather do in different situations using the phrasal verbs embedded in the questions.

Level: B2+

Time: 45 minutes

Objectives:

  1. To practise using some common phrasal verbs whilst playing Brace  yourselves. Phrasal verbs r bk board game.
  2. To predict what other students would do in different situations.

Materials:

  1. Printable Brace yourselves. Phrasal verbs r bk board game.
  2. One die per group of 3.
  3. One checker per player.

Procedure:

  1. Put the students in groups of 3, and give them a copy of  Brace  yourselves. Phrasal verbs r bk board game and a die.
  2. Players take it in turns to throw the die twice – the first throw indicates which column they should use, and the second throw indicates which row, to obtain the question.
  3. When Player 1 lands on a square, the other player or players have to predict what he or she would rather do, justifying their predictions. Player 1 must then say which prediction was correct and why.
  4. The game continues in the circle going left.
  5. At the end, ask the students to name three things they predicted correctly and three things they would never have guessed.

Related posts:

Would you rather…?

Decisions, decisions…!

Single and ready to mingle

Hit the road

How do you …?

CAE examination? Beat frustration with thorough preparation

Introduction:

This is an activity for C1 students to practise word formation. Students change verbs into adjectives and create sentences true for BOTH them and their partner. The words for this exercise have been taken from the CAE exams (Reading and Use of English part 3) and they are examples of words my students tend to struggle with.

Level: C1

Time: 45 minutes

Objectives:

  1. To practise word formation.
  2. To create statements that are true for all the students working in pairs or small groups.

Materials:

  1. Worksheet CAE examination. Beat frustration with thorough preparation, one per student.

Procedure:

  1. Hand out a Worksheet CAE examination? Beat frustration with thorough preparation to each student.
  2. Individually, students use the words in the left-hand column to form adjectives, e.g. to avoid: (un) avoidable. Encourage students to provide examples of both negative and positive adjectives.
  3. When the students have finished, they compare their answers with a classmate.
  4. Monitor and check answers as a class.
  5. In their pairs, students now write sentences that are true for BOTH them and their classmate which guarantees plenty of discussion and recycling of vocabulary,g. Student A: I think the view out of our classroom window is outstanding? Student B: You must be kidding; the only outstanding thing about it is the lack of litter on the floor, unlike everywhere else in the city. The students continue until they find something they both agree is outstanding.
  6. When the students have finished, ask them to share the most interesting statements they came up with.

Fast finishers: 

  1. In pairs, students underline the common adjective suffixes, e.g. -able, etc. and come up with more examples of adjectives with the same suffixes.

Related posts:

FCE Examination? Beat frustration with thorough preparation

Word formation station. Get off without trepidation.

Word formation station. Get off without trepidation. Part 2

Prepositions? Oh, dear humanity …not again!

Introduction: 

This is a Find Someone Who activity to practise using common adjectives with prepositions which my Spanish students seem to struggle with quite a lot. It allows students to interact with different classmates and discuss a variety of topics.

Level: A2+

Objectives:

  1. To complete sentences with missing prepositions.
  2. To decide if the statements are true for the students themselves.
  3. To get other classmates’ opinions on all the statements on the worksheet.
  4. To give students additional speaking practice using common adjectives with prepositions.

Materials:

  1. Prepositions. Oh, dear humanity …not again! worksheet, one per student.

Procedure:

  1. Hand out one Find Someone Who worksheet to each student.
  2. Individually students complete 15 sentences in the table with the missing prepositions.
  3. When the students have finished, they check the answers with a partner.
  4. Check together as a class.
  5. Individually, ask students to decide if the sentences are true for them and ask them to write their answers down just below the sentences e.g. I am afraid of the dark. You: No, I am not afraid of the dark.  
  6. Next students mingle with other students, asking about the sentences on their worksheet, e.g.  Are you afraid of the dark?
  7. They must then complete the box with the classmate’s answer e.g.: Student A: Are you tired of getting up early? Student B: Well, not really. I start work at 5 in the afternoon so I never wake up before 10. Student A: Lucky you. Classmate: Stuart is not tired of getting up early.
  8. Encourage students to ask for an additional piece of information from each classmate.
  9. When the students have had a chance to ask everyone’s opinion, ask them to share the most interesting views with the rest of the class.

Fast finishers:

  1. Students write down 6 sentences to summarise who agreed or disagreed with the statements, e.g. Alex and I are very excited about our holiday in Cuenca. Stuart and I aren’t fond of waking up early.

Related posts:

A grand (two-party) coalition of verbs and prepositions

If my memory serves me right…

Ask a Q board game

When & where board game

The search is on (preposition game)