Can you see the error of your ways?

Introduction:

This is an activity for lower intermediate students to review some of the most common mistakes they make. The students correct the mistakes individually, write sentences that are true for them and interview their partners.

Level: A2

Time: 45 minutes

Objectives:

  1. To identify and correct common mistakes made by lower intermediate students.
  2. To practice changing statements into questions.
  3. To develop fluency and confidence in speaking.

Materials:

  1. Can you see the error of your ways worksheet, one per student

Procedure:

  1. On the left hand side of the board, write I have 2 childrens. Explain the sentence is incorrect and in pairs, or groups of three, ask students to highlight the error and correct the sentence, e.g. I don’t have any children, I have 3 children, etc.
  2. When they have finished, ask them what the error was and underline it on the board. To the right of the sentence, ask them to write their correct sentences in a column on the board. Go through them together as a class and ask which statement is true for them – underline it on the board.
  3. Then, in their pairs, ask the students to change the statement from the first column into a question, e.g. Do you have any children? How many children do you have? Write on the board in a column to the right of the correct sentences.
  4. Clarify understanding and explain any incorrect suggestions.
  5. Give each student a Can you see the error of your ways… worksheet and individually ask students to circle the mistakes in sentences 1 to 12.
  6. When they have finished, they check the answers with a partner.
  7. Individually, students then write a correct sentence in the second column, making the statement true for them, as per the example.
  8. When they have finished, they check the answers with a partner.
  9. Individually, ask the students to change the statements from the first column into questions and write them down in the third column, as per the example.
  10. Monitor closely. When they have finished, they check the answers with a partner.
  11. Explain any mistakes on the board using the correct structures.
  12. Then, put students into pairs, or groups of three, and ask them to interview each other using the questions.
  13. If students need more practice, ask them to switch pairs / groups and repeat the process.

Fast finishers:

  1. Ask students to write down 4 things they have learned about their classmates.

Related posts:

Bid it 2 Win it FCE Sentence Auction

Bid it 2 Win it Sentence Auction

My favourite mistakes card game

P.S. Thank you Alex.

 

Hypothetically speaking

Introduction:

This is a short writing activity for intermediate students to revise the second conditional. The students answer the questions individually, read and match their classmate’s answers and further discuss the responses that caught their attention.

Level: B1

Time: 45 minutes

Objectives:

  1. To answer questions using the second conditional.
  2. To match their classmates’ responses to the questions.
  3. To discuss the questions that caught students’ attention using the second conditional.

Materials:

  1. Hypothetically speaking worksheet, one per student

Procedure:

  1. Give each student a Hypothetically speaking worksheet and ask them to answer the questions in random order, e.g. write the answer to question 1 next to letter d etc.
  2. Put students in pairs, or groups of 3, and ask them to swap papers. The students now read each other’s answers and match the responses to the questions. Encourage students to correct any mistakes they might come across when they go through their classmate’s sentences and ask them to underline the responses that catch their attention.
  3. Monitor throughout the activity.
  4. Now ask the students to swap the papers and check if their classmates matched the responses correctly.
  5. Elicit some answers from the students. When I did this activity for the first time I couldn’t believe how many original responses the students came up with.
  6. In the same pairs or groups of 3 now ask the students to explain in detail the underlined answers using the second conditional.

Fast finishers

  1. Ask students to take 4 of their responses and use them as beginnings of new sentences, e.g. If everyone in the world was madly in love with me, I would be over the moon. I would be over the moon, if I could speak English with an Irish accent.

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(Un)conditional love

 

What’s with all the questions?

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Introduction:

This is a fun board game activity to practise asking wh- questions and any other grammar points you would currently like to revise or practise with your students, e.g. Subject/object questions and present tenses, etc. Students ask and answer wh- questions about a variety of topics.

Level: A2+

Time: 45 minutes

Objectives:

  1. To practise asking wh- questions.
  2. To develop fluency and confidence in speaking.

Materials:

  1. What’s with all the questions PDF board game and one die per pair, or a small group of 3 or 4.

Procedure:

  1. Print the board game and put students in pairs or small groups of 3 or 4.
  2. Players take it in turns to throw the die and move the numbers thrown.
  3. To obtain a question for the speaking activity students throw the die twice. The first throw indicates which column they should use, and the second throw which row they should use to obtain the topic.
  4. Player 1 must then ask their partner or teammates at least 2 questions on the given topic, beginning with who, what, where, when, why and how, focusing on the recent language point studied, e.g. Where do you usually eat lunch? What do you have for breakfast? for present simple, or Where did you eat lunch when you were at school? What was your favourite food when you were a child? to practise past simple, etc. Increase the level of difficulty depending on the level of your class.
  5. The other player/s then answer the questions in as much detail as possible.
  6. The game continues in a circle going left.
  7. At the end, ask students to write down 4 additional questions for their classmates about a topic that sparked their interest the most.

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Summary of past or recent events

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P.S. Do you think your students would enjoy this activity? I’d love to know your thoughts.

Bid it 2 Win it FCE Sentence Auction


Introduction:

This is a sentence auction activity for Spanish FCE students. Students work in groups and bid on the sentences they think they can correct. This activity could also be used with lower CAE groups.

Level: B2

Time: 45 minutes

Objectives:

  1. To review the most common mistakes made by Spanish FCE students in an entertaining way.

Materials:

  1. Bid it 2 Win it FCE Sentence Auction, one worksheet for the teacher.

Procedure:

  1. Put students in small groups of 2 or 3.
  2. Each group will have £2000 to spend.
  3. Bids begin at £50 and each subsequent bid is increased by £100.
  4. The teacher writes the first sentence on the board and sells it to the highest bidder.
  5. Once the students have bought the sentence they have to rewrite it. If their answer is correct they keep the sentence. If they are wrong the sentence goes back on sale and the students can bid on it again at the end.
  6. The winner of the game is the group which has ended up with the most correct sentences.

Related posts:

Bid it 2 Win it Sentence Auction

My favourite mistakes card game

 

Bid it 2 Win it Sentence Auction

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Introduction: 

This is a sentence auction activity for students of mixed nationalities I am currently working with in Absolutely English Young Learners summer school in Sherborne, UK. Students work in groups and bid on the sentences they think they can correct.

Level: A2, B1, B2

Time: 45 minutes

Objectives:

  1. To buy and rewrite incorrect sentences.
  2. To review the most common mistakes made by different nationalities in an entertaining way.

Materials:

  1. Bid it 2 Win it Sentence Auction, one worksheet for the teacher.

Procedure:

  1. Put students in small groups of 2 or 3.
  2. Each group will have £2000 to spend.
  3. Bids begin at £50 and each subsequent bid is increased by £100.
  4. The teacher writes the first sentence on the board and sells it to the highest bidder.
  5. Once the students have bought the sentence they have to rewrite it. If their answer is correct they keep the sentence. If they are wrong the sentence goes back on sale and the students can bid on it again at the end.
  6. The winner of the game is the group which has ended up with the most correct sentences.

Related posts:

My favourite mistakes card game

P.S. Thank you for your constant encouragement, support and great feedback Stu. I really appreciate it.

The Good Ol’ Days

Introduction:

This is a great activity I’ve taken part in at acting classes. It allows intermediate students to practise used to in a really entertaining way.

Level:  B 1

Time: 1h

Objectives:

  1. To write a short dialogue about students’ past habits using used to.
  2. To act out another pair’s dialogue.

Procedure:

  1. In pairs, ask students about some of the activities they used to do regularly when they were younger, e.g. in primary school, they used to go the beach every summer and they used to go round their friends’ house every weekend, etc.
  2. In the same pairs, students must imagine they are two childhood friends who have just bumped into each other and start talking about all the fun things they did together when they were younger.
  3. In pairs, students write a dialogue between the two friends giving specific examples of the things they did using the USED TO structure, e.g. Student A: Do you remember when we used to go to that body blitz dancing class? We used to have so much fun trying to follow the teacher’s instructions. She used to get very annoyed if I made a mistake and used to tell me to repeat the steps over and over again. Student B: Yes! That was so much fun. I used to be really scared of her. Oh, and do you remember when after class we always used to get fish and chips, we were so hungry. We used to sit on the grass, eat and just chat for hours.
  4. Once the students have described at least 5 activities that they used to do together, ask the first two pairs to sit in front of the whole class. Try to create some space for students to perform this next activity.
  5. Ask the first pair (Student A and B) to read out the dialogue. While they read, the second pair (Student A and B) must listen carefully and act out all the actions the first pair describe (Student A from the second pair acts out the actions mentioned by Student A in the first pair, Student B from the second pair acts out the actions mentioned by Student B in the first pair).
  6. Encourage the other students to pay close attention to both pairs and check that all the actions have been “correctly“acted out.
  7. Continue until all the pairs have read their dialogues and have had a chance to act out another pair’s dialogue.

P.S. Thank you again for all your help Alex.

 

Are you bored or just boring?

Introduction: 

This is a board game activity to practise -ed and –ing adjectives. Students think of activities they like and dislike and play a board game with their classmates.

Level: B1

Time: 40 minutes

Objectives:

  1. To practise the difference between the –ed and –ing adjectives.
  2. To answer questions with the –ed and –ing adjectives.

Materials:

  1. Are you bored or just boring PDF board game, one per pair or a small group of 3 or 4.
  2. One die per pair or small group of 3 or 4.

Procedure:

  1. As a class, ask the students for one activity they enjoy, e.g. shopping, and one they dislike, e.g. cleaning – write them on either sides of the board. Ask them to think of adjectives to describe each activity and write them around the activity as they shout them out, e.g. shopping is entertaining, cleaning is boring, etc. Then ask them how these activities make them feel, e.g. shopping makes me feel entertained, cleaning makes me feel bored, etc. Consider using different colours of pens or different areas on the board to highlight the different adjective endings.
  2. In pairs, the students repeat the activity, thinking of three activities they enjoy and three they dislike, using adjectives to describe each activity and how it makes them feel.
  3. Monitor and correct as necessary.
  4. Put the students into new pairs or small groups of 3 or 4. Hand out Are you bored or just boring PDF board game and one die per pair or group.
  5. To obtain a question, the students throw the die twice. The first throw indicates which column they are going to use and the second indicates which row they are going to use.
  6. The players have to speak for at least 1 minute and must answer the question using the adjective in bold.
  7. The game continues in a circle going left and until each student has answered at least 5 questions.
  8. At the end ask the students to name three new things they have learnt about their classmates from the game they have just played.

Are you bored or just boring PDF board game

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Word formation station. Get off without trepidation. Part 2

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