Go Get ‘em tiger!

Introduction:

This is a Go Get ‘em tiger! printable board game for students to revise and practise using some common expressions with GO and GET. The students play a board game and then do a quick test in teams to test their memory.

Level: B1+

Time: 45 minutes

Objectives:

  1. To practise using some common expressions with go and get.
  2. To complete exercises 1 and 2 (Go Get ‘em tiger! Worksheet) using expressions with go and get.

Materials:

  1. Printable Go Get ‘em tiger! board game.
  2. One die per group of 3.
  3. Go Get ‘em tiger! Worksheet

Procedure:

  1. Put the students in groups of 3, and give them a copy of Go Get ‘em tiger! board game and a die.
  2. Players take it in turns to throw the die twice – the first throw indicates which column they should use, and the second throw indicates which row, to obtain the question.
  3. When a player lands on a square they must answer the question from that square. The player has to answer the question using the expression in bold at least 2 times, e.g. I get on quite well with my parents, although I must say it’s my mother I get on better with. We seem to have more things in common.
  4. The game continues in the circle going left.
  5. At the end, ask the students to name three collocations they use on a regular basis and three they have never used before.
  6. Put the students in new teams and hand each team Go Get ‘em tiger!
  7. Students complete the exercises in teams.
  8. The first team to complete the exercises correctly wins. Make sure students don’t look at the board game during the quiz.

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P.S. Thank you for all your help Alex.

Brace yourselves. Phrasal verbs r bk

Introduction:

This is a Brace  yourselves. Phrasal verbs r bk printable board game for students to revise and practise using some common phrasal verbs. The students play a board game and predict what other students would rather do in different situations using the phrasal verbs embedded in the questions.

Level: B2+

Time: 45 minutes

Objectives:

  1. To practise using some common phrasal verbs whilst playing Brace  yourselves. Phrasal verbs r bk board game.
  2. To predict what other students would do in different situations.

Materials:

  1. Printable Brace yourselves. Phrasal verbs r bk board game.
  2. One die per group of 3.
  3. One checker per player.

Procedure:

  1. Put the students in groups of 3, and give them a copy of  Brace  yourselves. Phrasal verbs r bk board game and a die.
  2. Players take it in turns to throw the die twice – the first throw indicates which column they should use, and the second throw indicates which row, to obtain the question.
  3. When Player 1 lands on a square, the other player or players have to predict what he or she would rather do, justifying their predictions. Player 1 must then say which prediction was correct and why.
  4. The game continues in the circle going left.
  5. At the end, ask the students to name three things they predicted correctly and three things they would never have guessed.

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Would you rather…?

Decisions, decisions…!

Single and ready to mingle

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How do you …?

Would you rather…?

Introduction:

This is a free Would you rather…? printable board game for students to get to know each other better or/and to practise speaking for fluency. The game could be used at the beginning of each term/year, when a new student joins the class or as a starter or an activity at the end of the class.

Level: B1+

Time: 45 minutes

Objectives:

  1. To practise speaking for fluency whilst answering Would you rather…? questions.
  2. To learn new things about students’ classmates.

Materials:

  1. Printable Would you rather board game .
  2. One die per group of 2 or 3.
  3. One checker per player.

Procedure:

  1. Put the students in pairs, or groups of 3, and give them a copy of ‘Would you rather…?’ board game and a die.
  2. Players take it in turns to throw the die twice – the first throw indicates which column they should use, and the second throw indicates which row, to obtain the question.
  3. When a player lands on a square, they answer the question from that square. The player has to justify their answer and give examples.
  4. The game continues in the circle going left.
  5. At the end, ask the students to name three things they have strongly agreed on, or disagreed on, with their classmates.

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P.S. Happy St Nicholas Day.

Double Decker

Introduction:

These are two board game activities to answer funny questions using past simple and present perfect. The games can be used together, or separately, depending on the objectives of the lesson.

Level: B1 +

Objectives:

  1. To practise answering When was the last time you…? and Have you ever…? questions.
  2. To develop speaking fluency, whilst revising regular and irregular verbs.
  3. To draw students’ attention to the difference between past simple and present perfect if two games are played in the same lesson.

Materials:

  1. 2 PDF Double Decker board games, one per pair or group of 3; a die per pair or group of 3.

Procedure:

  1. Put the students in pairs, or groups of 3, and give them a copy of one of the board games and a die. Aim to have two board games in use at the same time if you want to concentrate on explaining the differences between the tenses.
  2. Ask the students to look at the infinitives on their board games e.g. To hold a new born baby and in their groups ask them to change each verb into past simple and past participle e.g. to hold, held, held.
  3. Check as a class.
  4. Now players take it in turns to throw the die twice – the first throw indicates which column they should use, and the second throw indicates which row, to obtain the expression.
  5. The player must then ask their classmate a question using the expression on the given square e.g. When was the last time you held a newborn baby? Or Have you ever called someone by the wrong name? The other players answer the question and provide their partner, or other two group members, with as much detail as possible.
  6. The game continues in a circle going left.
  7. Swap the board games after sufficient time to allow two games to be played by each pair or group.
  8. At the end, ask the students to name some surprising and unexpected things they have learnt about their classmates.

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What’s with all the questions?

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Introduction:

This is a fun board game activity to practise asking wh- questions and any other grammar points you would currently like to revise or practise with your students, e.g. Subject/object questions and present tenses, etc. Students ask and answer wh- questions about a variety of topics.

Level: A2+

Time: 45 minutes

Objectives:

  1. To practise asking wh- questions.
  2. To develop fluency and confidence in speaking.

Materials:

  1. What’s with all the questions PDF board game and one die per pair, or a small group of 3 or 4.

Procedure:

  1. Print the board game and put students in pairs or small groups of 3 or 4.
  2. Players take it in turns to throw the die and move the numbers thrown.
  3. To obtain a question for the speaking activity students throw the die twice. The first throw indicates which column they should use, and the second throw which row they should use to obtain the topic.
  4. Player 1 must then ask their partner or teammates at least 2 questions on the given topic, beginning with who, what, where, when, why and how, focusing on the recent language point studied, e.g. Where do you usually eat lunch? What do you have for breakfast? for present simple, or Where did you eat lunch when you were at school? What was your favourite food when you were a child? to practise past simple, etc. Increase the level of difficulty depending on the level of your class.
  5. The other player/s then answer the questions in as much detail as possible.
  6. The game continues in a circle going left.
  7. At the end, ask students to write down 4 additional questions for their classmates about a topic that sparked their interest the most.

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P.S. Do you think your students would enjoy this activity? I’d love to know your thoughts.

Back to life, back to reality

Introduction:

This is a needs analysis board game to do at the beginning of the course and to give both the teacher and the students an idea of what they already know and what they want to achieve in this course or academic year.

Level:  B2 +

Time: 35 minutes

Objectives:

  1. To determine students’ needs at the beginning of the course.

Materials:

One Back to life, back to reality board game and one die per pair or a small group of 3.

Procedure:

  1. Print the board game and put students in pairs or small groups of 3.
  2. Players take it in turns to throw the die and move the numbers thrown.
  3. To obtain a question for the speaking activity students throw the die twice. The first throw indicates which column they are going to use and the second indicates which row they are going to use.
  4. All the players must answer the question in as much detail as possible.
  5. The game continues in a circle going left and until students have answered at least 5 questions.
  6. During the activity monitor very carefully and take notes.
  7. At the end, ask students (still in their groups) to write three things they had in common with their classmates, (e.g. they need English for their jobs, they want to improve their listening comprehension, etc.) and three differences, (e.g. they have learnt English in different countries, etc).

P.S. Thank you Alex.

Getting itchy feet

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Introduction:

These are activities to introduce travel vocabulary and to encourage speaking about travelling. Students do a word search activity and then do the speaking activity with their classmates.

Level: B1 +

Objectives:

  1. To introduce travel vocabulary.
  2. To answer questions about travelling using the new vocabulary.

Materials:

  1. Getting itchy feet worksheet, one per student.
  2. Getting itchy feet board game, one per group of three.
  3. Getting itchy feet worksheet solutions

Procedure:

  1. Write down the following 18 letters on the board A, B, C, C, C, C, D, F, G, J, L, L, R, R, S, S, T and V. In pairs, ask students to write down ONE travel related word that begins with the letters above. Set a timer to make the activity more competitive, e.g. 5 minutes. When the time is up ask students to compare their answers with another pair.
  2. Check as a class and make sure students know the meaning of all the words that came up during the activity.
  3. Hand out a copy of Getting itchy feet worksheet and ask students to find 18 travel related words in the word search. Tell students the letters in bold are either the first or the last letters of the words they are searching for.
  4. When the students have finished, ask them to add the words found to the list they created at the beginning.
  5. Check together as a class to make sure students know the meaning of all the words.
  6. Put the students into pairs, or groups of 3, and give them a copy of Getting itchy feet board game and 3 dice.
  7. Players take it in turns to throw the die twice – the first throw indicates which column they should use, and the second throw indicates which row, to obtain the question. The player who has rolled and obtained a question must then choose a word from the list of travel vocabulary without telling the others, and keep talking until they have naturally incorporated the word into their answer and have fully answered the question. Whilst the player is speaking, the role of the others is to listen for and identify the travel word. When it has been identified and the player has finished speaking, the word is crossed off the list and it is the turn of the next player.
  8. At the end, ask the students to name three words they have struggled to incorporate into their responses.

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