So, what brings you here?

Introduction: 

This is a board game that could be used to assess your learners’ needs or to simply do a review of tenses. Students answer questions in pairs or small groups of three and the teacher closely monitors to determine what the learners are struggling with. I have deliberately chosen the questions that hopefully only evoke positive 🙂 emotions from learners to make them feel good throughout the activity especially if is their first class and they don’t know the teacher and/or the classmates.

Level: B1+

Time: 45 minutes

Objectives:

  1. To assess the learners’ needs.
  2. To review past, present and future tenses etc.
  3. To answer questions containing the target language whilst playing a board game.

Materials (Click on the worksheet below to download the PDF file):

  1. So, what brings you here board game and one die per group of 3.

Procedure:

  1. Put the students in groups of 2 or 3, and give them a copy of So, what brings you here? board game and a die.
  2. Players take it in turns to throw the die twice – the first throw indicates which column they should use, and the second throw indicates which row, to obtain the question.
  3. When a player lands on a square all three players must answer the question from that square in as much detail as possible. Encourage students to ask each other additional questions to obtain more information.
  4. The game continues in the circle going left.
  5. At the end, write down the mistakes students made during the activity and ask them to correct them in their teams.
  6. Check together as a class.
  7. Ask students what they found out about their classmates.

Recommended reading:

https://www.forbes.com/sites/amberjohnson-jimludema/2018/03/29/for-a-high-performing-team-ask-positive-questions/#46af16781ddf

Related posts:

Do you believe in ghosts?

What would you do if…?

Brace yourselves. Phrasal verbs r bk

 

 

Simply perfect

Introduction: 

This is a board game for B2 students to review past simple and present perfect. Students complete the board game with their own examples and then answer question in pairs or small groups of three.

Level: B2

Time: 45 minutes

Objectives:

  1. To review past simple and present perfect.
  2. To write examples on the board using the target language.
  3. To answer questions containing the target language whilst playing a board game.

Materials (Click on the worksheet below to download the PDF file):

  1. Simply perfect board game and one die per group of 3.

Procedure:

  1. Put the students in groups of 2 or 3, and give them a copy of Simply perfect board game.
  2. Students first underline the verbs in all the questions on the board.
  3. Next, students use the underlined verbs to write a new question in the empty square provided below, changing all questions in the past simple tense into questions in the present perfect tense and all the questions in the present perfect tense into questions in the past simple tense, e.g. Change the question in Square 1:1 What did you eat for dinner last night? into What have you eaten today? for Square 2:1. Change the question in Square 4:1 Have you ever ridden an animal? into Did you ride a horse when you were little? for Square 4:2. The only requirement is for students to use the same verb in their new question.
  4. When the students have finished they pass their board game to the team/ group on their right.
  5. Students now go over ALL the examples written by their classmates to make sure they are grammatically correct.
  6. Check together as a class.
  7. Hand each group a die.
  8. Players take it in turns to throw the die twice – the first throw indicates which column they should use, and the second throw indicates which row, to obtain the question.
  9. When a player lands on a square all three players must answer the question from that square in as much detail as possible. Encourage students to ask each other additional questions to obtain more information.
  10. The game continues in the circle going left.
  11. At the end, ask the students to choose three questions they didn’t answer during the game and answer them in writing.

Related posts:

http://www.onestopenglish.com/community/lesson-share/pdf-content/lesson-share-time-expressions-lesson-plan/556366.article

Summary of past or recent events

Best birthday ever

Ir(regular) Xmas

Double Decker

Do you believe in ghosts?

Introduction: 

This is a board game for B2 students to review common verbs and prepositions. Students answer questions containing the target language and do a couple of recycling activities at the end to further reinforce the vocabulary.

Level: B2

Time: 45 minutes

Objectives:

  1. To review common verbs and prepositions.
  2. To use the verbs and prepositions in context whilst playing a board game.

Materials (Click on the worksheet below to download the PDF file):

  1. Do you believe in ghosts? board game.
  2. One die per group of 3.

Procedure:

  1. Put the students in groups of 3, and give them a copy of Do you believe in ghosts? board game and a die. All the verbs and dependent prepositions are in bold to encourage noticing.
  2. Players take it in turns to throw the die twice – the first throw indicates which column they should use, and the second throw indicates which row, to obtain the question.
  3. When a player lands on a square all three players must answer the question from that square in as much detail as possible. Encourage students to ask each other additional questions to obtain more information.
  4. The game continues in the circle going left.
  5. At the end, ask the students to copy all the verbs and prepositions in alphabetical order in their notebooks and finally circle the verbs they use on a regular basis, underline the ones that were new and tick the expressions they didn’t get to use whilst playing the board game.

Fast finishers:

  1. Ask students to write their own questions with the verbs they didn’t practice whilst playing the board game and interview their classmates.

Related posts:

A grand (two-party) coalition of verbs and prepositions

What would you do if…?

Introduction: 

This is a board game for B2 students to review the second conditional. Students complete the board game with their own examples and then play a game in pairs or small groups of three.

Level: B2

Time: 45 minutes

Objectives:

  1. To review the second conditional.
  2. To write examples on the board using the target language.
  3. To answer questions containing the target language whilst playing a board game.

Materials (Click on the worksheet below to download the PDF file):

  1. What would you do if… board game and one die per group of 3.

Procedure:

  1. Put the students in groups of 2 or 3, and give them a copy of What would you do if…? board game.
  2. Students now complete the blue squares with their own examples. If the verb is already given, students must use that verb in their example, e.g. What would you do if… you broke your friend’s phone?
  3. When the students have finished they pass their board game to the team/ group on their right.
  4. Students now go over ALL the examples written by their classmates to make sure they are grammatically correct.
  5. Check together as a class.
  6. Hand each group a die.
  7. Players take it in turns to throw the die twice – the first throw indicates which column they should use, and the second throw indicates which row, to obtain the question.
  8. When a player lands on a square all three players must answer the question from that square in as much detail as possible. Encourage students to ask each other additional questions to obtain more information.
  9. The game continues in the circle going left.
  10. At the end, ask the students to choose three questions they didn’t answer during the game and answer them in writing.

Related posts:

Hypothetically speaking

(Un)conditional love

Know thyself

Introduction:

This is a free board game to talk about philosophy. I have done this activity with some of my advanced and proficient students just because sometimes they fancy talking about something exciting and less mundane, without focusing on a specific outcome in mind. Many students also often ask me to give them an opportunity to talk about more challenging topics, so this is for them. If you feel uncomfortable about having no objectives, you could turn this activity into a debate and introduce some lovely agreeing and disagreeing expressions. If you are feeling rebellious just join the discussion and have fun with your students.

Level: C1

Objective:

  1. To have an inspired conversation about life in general.

Materials (Click on the worksheet below to download the PDF file):

  1. Know thyself, one PDF board game per pair or group of 3.

Procedure:

  1. Put the students in pairs, or groups of 3, and give them a copy of the board game and a die.
  2. Players take it in turns to throw the die twice – the first throw indicates which column they should use, and the second throw indicates which row, to obtain the question.
  3. The players must then speak on that topic for as long as they find it interesting and in as much detail as possible. Do not rush the students but give them absolute control over the activity, as long as they answer the questions in English. Monitor and help with vocabulary as needed.
  4. The game continues in a circle going left.
  5. At the end, ask the students to choose one topic they would like to explore further and ask them to write an article or an essay at home. I did it with my students and they produced very interesting pieces.
  6. Encourage students to watch How philosophy can save our life Ted talk https://ed.ted.com/on/JQxh4veu

Reference: http://www.mantelligence.com

Blah Blah PET Part 1

Introduction:

This is a short error correction activity and a board game to practise giving personal information about yourself, where you live, your hobbies, your job, etc. as well as to prepare students for Speaking Part 1 of the PET exam.

Level: B1

Objectives:

  1. To raise students’ awareness of some of the most common preposition & article mistakes they make.
  2. To correct mistakes in sentences 1-14 (I can’t believe I said that Worksheet).
  3. To practise giving personal information.
  4. To encourage peer correction.

Materials (Click on the worksheets below to download the PDF files):

  1. I can_t believe I said that Worksheet, one per student.
  2. Blah Blah PET Part 1 board game and a die, one per pair or group of 3.

Procedure:

  1. Give students a copy of I can’t believe I said that Worksheet (This exercise is based on the mistakes my own students made when we did this activity last week).
  2. Individually ask students to correct the mistakes in sentences 1-14. Tell students to concentrate ONLY on the prepositions and articles.
  3. When the students have finished, ask them to check their answers with a classmate. Together they must decide on an answer and agree: this increases talking time and requires repetition of the language.
  4. Check together as a class. The class must decide as a group what they believe the correct answer to be. As teacher, only write their final answers on the board, do not tell them if they are correct or not at this stage. Once they have discussed and agreed on all of their answers as a class, tell them how many (if any) they have wrong – do not tell them which ones are wrong. As a class, they must review all of the questions and decide which one(s) they think is incorrect.
  5. Put the students in pairs or groups of 3 and give them a copy of Blah Blah PET Part 1 board game and a die.
  6. Players take it in turns to throw the die twice – the first throw indicates which column they should use, and the second throw indicates which row, to obtain the question.
  7. The player must then answer the question from that square. Encourage students to give more than just short one or two word answers. Ask the other students to pay CLOSE attention and write down any preposition or article mistakes they think their classmate made.
  8. The game continues in a circle going left.
  9. At the end, ask the students to share if they have noticed any incorrect use of articles and prepositions and go through their notes with the rest of the class.

Related posts:

Can you see the error of your ways?

Bid it 2 Win it FCE Sentence Auction

Bid it 2 Win it Sentence Auction

My favourite mistakes card game

Triple treat makes a comeback

Introduction:

These are three board game activities to talk about health, students’ hometowns and fashion. They can be used together or separately, and are a great way to help students practise speaking and develop fluency, as well as prepare for Part 1 of the FCE /CAE speaking exam.

Level: B2+

Objectives:

  1. To practise speaking about health, students’ hometowns and fashion.

Materials (Click on the worksheet below to download the PDF file):

  1. Triple treat makes a comeback, one PDF board game per pair or group of 3; a die and a timer per pair or group of 3.

Procedure:

  1. Put the students in pairs or groups of 3 and give them a copy of one of the board games and a die, they can use their phones for the timer. Aim to have all three board games in use at the same time.
  2. Players take it in turns to throw the die twice – the first throw indicates which column they should use, and the second throw indicates which row, to obtain the question.
  3. The player must then speak for at least 1 minute on that topic and provide their partner, or other two group members, with as much detail as possible.
  4. The game continues in a circle going left.
  5. Swap the board games after sufficient time to allow all three games to be played by each pair or group.
  6. At the end, ask the students to name three new things they have learnt about their classmates.

Related posts:

Triple Treat