Half full or half empty?

Introduction: 

This is a board game to introduce and practise idioms and phrases related to happiness and misery. Students divide the idioms into two categories: jumping for joy and running on empty (sad) and answer questions about happiness using the new idioms.

Level: B2

Time: 60 minutes

Objectives:

  1. To introduce idioms related to happiness and misery.
  2. To divide the idioms into happy and not so much.
  3. To answer and ask questions about happiness and misery whilst playing a board game.

Materials (Click on the worksheet below to download the PDF file):

  1. Half full or half empty board game, one per group.

Procedure:

  1. Ask students to briefly discuss in pairs whether they consider themselves to be positive or negative people and give examples from their own life.
  2. Next write the following idioms and phrases on the board:
  • To be a bundle of joy
  • To be happy as a clam
  • To be in bits
  • To be on cloud nine
  • To be reduced to tears
  • To be walking on air
  • To feel like a dog with two tails
  • To have a face like a wet weekend
  • To have a whale of a time
  • To have the blues
  • To mope around
  • To take something hard
  1. In pairs ask students to divide the idioms above into two categories: jumping for joy (happy) and running on empty (sad).
  2. Check together as a class and make sure students know the meaning of each idiom.
  3. Put the students in groups of 2 or 3, and give them a copy of Half full or half empty board game and a die.
  4. Now ask the players to write down the “happy” idioms in the orange squares (orange supposedly evokes feelings of happiness, optimism and energy) and “unhappy “idioms in the blue squares (said to express sadness, but can also be calming and soothing so not all hope is lost).
  5. Players take it in turns to throw the die twice – the first throw indicates which column they should use, and the second throw indicates which row, to obtain the question.
  6. When a player lands on a square they must answer the question from that square in as much detail as possible AND using two idioms (they can choose from either the idioms in the same row or the same column). Encourage students to ask each other additional questions to obtain more information. When a player lands on a square with an idiom they must use it to form a question for their partner(s), e.g. Do you always have a whale of a time when you go out with your friends?
  7. The game continues in the circle going left.
  8. At the end, ask students what they found out about their classmates.

Fast finishers:

Give students the scrambled up idioms and ask them to unscramble them from memory:

  • A time have of a whale to
  • Like to with tails feel two a dog
  • Of a joy be bundle to
  • To clam be as happy a
  • To hard something take
  • To weekend face like a wet have a

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Ups and downs

Can’t stop dishing out idioms

You make my heart BEET 😉

Zzz

There is no place like…school

Keep up the good work

Introduction: 

These are activities to introduce and practise phrasal verbs related to work. Students match the phrasal verbs to their definitions and play a board game.

Level: B2

Time: 60 minutes

Objectives:

  1. To introduce phrasal verbs related to work.
  2. To match the phrasal verbs to their definitions.
  3. To answer and ask questions about work whilst playing a board game.

Materials (Click on the worksheets below to download the PDF files):

  1. Keep up the good work Worksheet, one per student.
  2. Keep up the good work board game, one per group.

Procedure

  1. Write ‘ “Work is the key to success and hard work can help you accomplish anything” Vince Lombardi on the boardAsk students to discuss the quote in pairs and give examples from their own lives.
  2. Hand the students Keep up the good work Worksheet.
  3. Individually, students write down the definitions (a-l) of the phrasal verbs in sentences 1 to 12 in the spaces provided. You could also ask students to first try and define the phrasal verbs without looking at the definitions.
  4. When the students have finished, they compare their answers with a partner.
  5. Check the answers as a class.
  6. Next put the students in groups of 2 or 3, and give them a copy of Keep up the good work board game and a die.
  7. Players take it in turns to throw the die twice – the first throw indicates which column they should use, and the second throw indicates which row, to obtain the question /phrasal verb.
  8. When a player lands on a square all three players must answer the question from that square in as much detail as possible. Encourage students to ask each other additional questions to obtain more information. When a player lands on a square with a phrasal verb they must use it to form a question for their partner(s), e.g.  Have you or  anyone you know ever been laid off?
  9. The game continues in the circle going left.
  10. At the end, ask students what they found out about their classmates.

Fast finishers:

  1. Ask students to briefly describe their professional career using at least 5 phrasal verbs they have learnt. Younger students could describe what they would like their future job to look like.

Food for thought:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2R_BKlb_Y8k

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Stop beating around the bush

Phrasal verbs can be put off, never forgotten

Brace yourselves. Phrasal verbs r bk

How do you …?

Single and ready to mingle

 

 

A good old chin wag

Introduction: 

This is a starter you can use with any new group, or at the beginning of any class, really. Students complete the sentences individually and look for the students whose strips of paper they have selected, to interview them further. I have purposefully chosen sentences that hopefully will encourage students to respond in a positive way to make them feel good throughout the activity, especially if it is their first class and they don’t know the teacher and/or the classmates.

Note: This activity could be adapted if you want to use a warmer related to a specific topic, e.g. describing personalities. I have created an example worksheet for you called ‘It’s all me, me, me…’

Level: B1+

Time: 30 minutes

Objectives:

  1. To complete the sentences with students’ own ideas.
  2. To get to know other students better.

Materials (Click on the worksheet below to download the PDF file):

  1. A good old chin wag Worksheet
  2. It_s all me, me, me Worksheet ( Topic related warmer)

Procedure:

  1. Print one or two copies of A good old chin wag worksheet and cut the paper into strips.
  2. Hand each student two or three strips of paper and ask them to complete them individually with their answers, making sure they put their names on each piece.
  3. When the students have finished, put the strips in a container, e.g. a hat, and mix them up.
  4. Go round the classroom and ask students to pick two or three pieces of paper from the hat. If they pick one of their own, ask them to choose another one.
  5. Next, students walk around the classroom, find and speak to the students who completed the sentences on their pieces of paper. Students chat to each other and try to get more information from each other, e.g. I get great pleasure from drinking coffee. Oh really? How many coffees do you drink a day? Do you like it black or white? Etc.
  6. At the end ask students to share what they found out about their classmates.

P.S. Thank you Alex.

So, what brings you here?

Introduction: 

This is a board game that could be used to assess your learners’ needs or to simply do a review of tenses. Students answer questions in pairs or small groups of three and the teacher closely monitors to determine what the learners are struggling with. I have deliberately chosen the questions that hopefully only evoke positive 🙂 emotions from learners to make them feel good throughout the activity especially if is their first class and they don’t know the teacher and/or the classmates.

Level: B1+

Time: 45 minutes

Objectives:

  1. To assess the learners’ needs.
  2. To review past, present and future tenses etc.
  3. To answer questions containing the target language whilst playing a board game.

Materials (Click on the worksheet below to download the PDF file):

  1. So, what brings you here board game and one die per group of 3.

Procedure:

  1. Put the students in groups of 2 or 3, and give them a copy of So, what brings you here? board game and a die.
  2. Players take it in turns to throw the die twice – the first throw indicates which column they should use, and the second throw indicates which row, to obtain the question.
  3. When a player lands on a square all three players must answer the question from that square in as much detail as possible. Encourage students to ask each other additional questions to obtain more information.
  4. The game continues in the circle going left.
  5. At the end, write down the mistakes students made during the activity and ask them to correct them in their teams.
  6. Check together as a class.
  7. Ask students what they found out about their classmates.

Recommended reading:

https://www.forbes.com/sites/amberjohnson-jimludema/2018/03/29/for-a-high-performing-team-ask-positive-questions/#46af16781ddf

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Do you believe in ghosts?

What would you do if…?

Brace yourselves. Phrasal verbs r bk

 

 

Simply perfect

Introduction: 

This is a board game for B2 students to review past simple and present perfect. Students complete the board game with their own examples and then answer question in pairs or small groups of three.

Level: B2

Time: 45 minutes

Objectives:

  1. To review past simple and present perfect.
  2. To write examples on the board using the target language.
  3. To answer questions containing the target language whilst playing a board game.

Materials (Click on the worksheet below to download the PDF file):

  1. Simply perfect board game and one die per group of 3.

Procedure:

  1. Put the students in groups of 2 or 3, and give them a copy of Simply perfect board game.
  2. Students first underline the verbs in all the questions on the board.
  3. Next, students use the underlined verbs to write a new question in the empty square provided below, changing all questions in the past simple tense into questions in the present perfect tense and all the questions in the present perfect tense into questions in the past simple tense, e.g. Change the question in Square 1:1 What did you eat for dinner last night? into What have you eaten today? for Square 2:1. Change the question in Square 4:1 Have you ever ridden an animal? into Did you ride a horse when you were little? for Square 4:2. The only requirement is for students to use the same verb in their new question.
  4. When the students have finished they pass their board game to the team/ group on their right.
  5. Students now go over ALL the examples written by their classmates to make sure they are grammatically correct.
  6. Check together as a class.
  7. Hand each group a die.
  8. Players take it in turns to throw the die twice – the first throw indicates which column they should use, and the second throw indicates which row, to obtain the question.
  9. When a player lands on a square all three players must answer the question from that square in as much detail as possible. Encourage students to ask each other additional questions to obtain more information.
  10. The game continues in the circle going left.
  11. At the end, ask the students to choose three questions they didn’t answer during the game and answer them in writing.

Related posts:

http://www.onestopenglish.com/community/lesson-share/pdf-content/lesson-share-time-expressions-lesson-plan/556366.article

Summary of past or recent events

Best birthday ever

Ir(regular) Xmas

Double Decker

Who are you?

Introduction:

This is a fun activity for students to revise personality adjectives. Students match the adjectives to their antonyms, decide which adjectives apply most to them and look for classmates whose answers are either identical to theirs or very different.

Level: B2+

Time: 45 minutes

Objectives:

  1. To revise/ introduce adjectives describing personality.
  2. To decide which adjectives apply most to students and give examples.
  3. To compare students’ choices with other classmates.

Materials (Click on the worksheet below to download the PDF file):

  1. Who are you Worksheet, one per student.

Procedure:

  1. In pairs ask students to tell each other what personality types they get on with best and what personality types they just can’t stand.
  2. Elicit some answers from students.
  3. Hand each student a copy of Who are you? Worksheet and tell them to cover up the words at the bottom.
  4. Individually ask students to provide antonyms to the adjectives in the first column.
  5. When the students have finished ask them to compare with their partner.
  6. Next students look at the antonyms provided at the bottom of the page and complete the table.
  7. Check as a class.
  8. Individually now ask the student to consider each pair of adjectives and choose the number (1 to 5) closest to the adjective they feel applies most to them. Number 5 applies to the adjective in the first column and 1 to its antonym in the third column.
  9. Once the students have finished, put them into pairs and ask them to compare their choices with their classmates and provide specific examples where their numbers are identical or very different.
  10. Change pairs two or three times to give students a chance to compare their answers with as many classmates as possible.
  11. Ask students to give examples of unexpected answers they received whilst interviewing their classmates.

Fast finishers:

  1. Ask students to pick three positive and three negative adjectives from the table that best describe them and justify their answers to their classmates.

P.S. “Today you are You, that is truer than true. There is no one alive who is Youer than You.” Dr. Seuss

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Mirror Mirror on the wall…

MEOW!

Wanted

Know thyself

 

Do you believe in ghosts?

Introduction: 

This is a board game for B2 students to review common verbs and prepositions. Students answer questions containing the target language and do a couple of recycling activities at the end to further reinforce the vocabulary.

Level: B2

Time: 45 minutes

Objectives:

  1. To review common verbs and prepositions.
  2. To use the verbs and prepositions in context whilst playing a board game.

Materials (Click on the worksheet below to download the PDF file):

  1. Do you believe in ghosts? board game.
  2. One die per group of 3.

Procedure:

  1. Put the students in groups of 3, and give them a copy of Do you believe in ghosts? board game and a die. All the verbs and dependent prepositions are in bold to encourage noticing.
  2. Players take it in turns to throw the die twice – the first throw indicates which column they should use, and the second throw indicates which row, to obtain the question.
  3. When a player lands on a square all three players must answer the question from that square in as much detail as possible. Encourage students to ask each other additional questions to obtain more information.
  4. The game continues in the circle going left.
  5. At the end, ask the students to copy all the verbs and prepositions in alphabetical order in their notebooks and finally circle the verbs they use on a regular basis, underline the ones that were new and tick the expressions they didn’t get to use whilst playing the board game.

Fast finishers:

  1. Ask students to write their own questions with the verbs they didn’t practice whilst playing the board game and interview their classmates.

Related posts:

A grand (two-party) coalition of verbs and prepositions