Make or do? Have no clue :(

Introduction:

This is a fun, competitive card game for small groups of 3 or more players to review the most common collocations with do and make.

Level: B2

Time: 45 minutes

Objectives:

  1. To practise and review common collocations with do and make.
  2. To divide expressions into two categories: ones that collocate with do and ones that collocate with make.
  3. To collect the most cards by completing the sentences written on the cards.

Materials:

  1. 36 printable Make or do, have no clue Cards (laminate for future use).
  2. Make or do, have no clue Worksheet.

Procedure:

  1. Elicit some common collocations with do and make and write them on the board, such as homework / washing / judo; a cake, a mistake, a mess.
  2. Put students in small groups of 2 or 3 and give each group a Make or do? Have no clue Worksheet.
  3. To make the activity more competitive, tell students that the first group to complete the task correctly wins.
  4. Monitor and check answers as a class.
  5. Print and cut out the Make or do? Have no clue Cards, one set per group of 3 or 4.
  6. Place all cards face down on the table.
  7. The first player draws the top card off the pile and reads the incomplete sentence out loud. The remaining players listen to the sentence and try to guess if the expression in the sentence collocates with do or make (make sure students use the correct tense). The first player to raise their hand and give the correct answer keeps the card. To discourage random guessing you can penalize incorrect responses. If the answer is wrong, the card is placed at the bottom of the pile. Play continues in a circle going left.
  8. The winner is the player with the most cards at the end of the game.
  9. At the end of the game ask the players to give their cards to the player on their left. The players now individually make sentences with the collocations on their classmates’ cards, e.g. I make myself a cup of coffee as soon as I wake up. Adam makes wonderful coffee for his mother every morning.

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Go Get ‘em tiger!

Do, make, have or take? An instant headache

Go Get ‘em tiger!

Introduction:

This is a Go Get ‘em tiger! printable board game for students to revise and practise using some common expressions with GO and GET. The students play a board game and then do a quick test in teams to test their memory.

Level: B1+

Time: 45 minutes

Objectives:

  1. To practise using some common expressions with go and get.
  2. To complete exercises 1 and 2 (Go Get ‘em tiger! Worksheet) using expressions with go and get.

Materials:

  1. Printable Go Get ‘em tiger! board game.
  2. One die per group of 3.
  3. Go Get ‘em tiger! Worksheet

Procedure:

  1. Put the students in groups of 3, and give them a copy of Go Get ‘em tiger! board game and a die.
  2. Players take it in turns to throw the die twice – the first throw indicates which column they should use, and the second throw indicates which row, to obtain the question.
  3. When a player lands on a square they must answer the question from that square. The player has to answer the question using the expression in bold at least 2 times, e.g. I get on quite well with my parents, although I must say it’s my mother I get on better with. We seem to have more things in common.
  4. The game continues in the circle going left.
  5. At the end, ask the students to name three collocations they use on a regular basis and three they have never used before.
  6. Put the students in new teams and hand each team Go Get ‘em tiger!
  7. Students complete the exercises in teams.
  8. The first team to complete the exercises correctly wins. Make sure students don’t look at the board game during the quiz.

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Do, make, have or take? An instant headache

P.S. Thank you for all your help Alex.

Noughts and Crosses

 

Introduction:

This is an activity for PET students to practise Part 1 of the Writing Exam in a fun and competitive way. Students complete the second sentences in bold so that they mean the same as the first. The examples for this exercise are similar to the ones students could find in the PET exams (Writing Part 1).

Level: PET

Time: 45 minutes

Objectives:

  1. To complete the second sentences so that they mean the same as the first.
  2. To get a winning line of four Noughts or four Crosses in either a horizontal, vertical or diagonal row.

Materials:

  1. Noughts and Crosses Worksheet, one per pair.

Procedure:

  1. Divide the students into pairs and hand out a Noughts and Crosses Worksheet to each pair.
  2. Each player takes a turn to complete one of the second sentences in bold to mean the same as the first sentence using no more than three words. If they manage to do it correctly, they add either an O or an X to the board. The first player to line up 4 of their symbols in a row wins.
  3. Monitor at all times and go through some of the most problematic sentences together at the end of the class.

Fast finishers:

  1. Write 4 sentences about yourself using the structures from the sentences in bold, e.g.  I prefer working alone to working with other people. I have eaten a grasshopper before.

Brace yourselves. Phrasal verbs r bk

Introduction:

This is a Brace  yourselves. Phrasal verbs r bk printable board game for students to revise and practise using some common phrasal verbs. The students play a board game and predict what other students would rather do in different situations using the phrasal verbs embedded in the questions.

Level: B2+

Time: 45 minutes

Objectives:

  1. To practise using some common phrasal verbs whilst playing Brace  yourselves. Phrasal verbs r bk board game.
  2. To predict what other students would do in different situations.

Materials:

  1. Printable Brace yourselves. Phrasal verbs r bk board game.
  2. One die per group of 3.
  3. One checker per player.

Procedure:

  1. Put the students in groups of 3, and give them a copy of  Brace  yourselves. Phrasal verbs r bk board game and a die.
  2. Players take it in turns to throw the die twice – the first throw indicates which column they should use, and the second throw indicates which row, to obtain the question.
  3. When Player 1 lands on a square, the other player or players have to predict what he or she would rather do, justifying their predictions. Player 1 must then say which prediction was correct and why.
  4. The game continues in the circle going left.
  5. At the end, ask the students to name three things they predicted correctly and three things they would never have guessed.

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Would you rather…?

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Single and ready to mingle

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How do you …?

CAE examination? Beat frustration with thorough preparation

Introduction:

This is an activity for C1 students to practise word formation. Students change verbs into adjectives and create sentences true for BOTH them and their partner. The words for this exercise have been taken from the CAE exams (Reading and Use of English part 3) and they are examples of words my students tend to struggle with.

Level: C1

Time: 45 minutes

Objectives:

  1. To practise word formation.
  2. To create statements that are true for all the students working in pairs or small groups.

Materials:

  1. Worksheet CAE examination. Beat frustration with thorough preparation, one per student.

Procedure:

  1. Hand out a Worksheet CAE examination? Beat frustration with thorough preparation to each student.
  2. Individually, students use the words in the left-hand column to form adjectives, e.g. to avoid: (un) avoidable. Encourage students to provide examples of both negative and positive adjectives.
  3. When the students have finished, they compare their answers with a classmate.
  4. Monitor and check answers as a class.
  5. In their pairs, students now write sentences that are true for BOTH them and their classmate which guarantees plenty of discussion and recycling of vocabulary,g. Student A: I think the view out of our classroom window is outstanding? Student B: You must be kidding; the only outstanding thing about it is the lack of litter on the floor, unlike everywhere else in the city. The students continue until they find something they both agree is outstanding.
  6. When the students have finished, ask them to share the most interesting statements they came up with.

Fast finishers: 

  1. In pairs, students underline the common adjective suffixes, e.g. -able, etc. and come up with more examples of adjectives with the same suffixes.

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FCE Examination? Beat frustration with thorough preparation

Word formation station. Get off without trepidation.

Word formation station. Get off without trepidation. Part 2

Zzz

Introduction:

This is an activity to introduce and practise idioms and expressions related to sleep. Students first divide the expressions into 3 categories, then complete the questions with the missing idioms and expressions and answer the questions with their classmates.

Level: B2

Time: 60 minutes

Objectives:

  1. To increase familiarity and correct use of idioms and expressions related to sleep.
  2. To complete the questions in Exercise 2 with the missing expressions.
  3. To develop fluency and answer questions containing the target language in pairs.

Materials:

  1. Zzz Worksheet, one per student.

Procedure:

  1. Write down the following questions on the board and ask students to discuss them in pairs:

How many hours of sleep do you need per night? Are you a light sleeper or a heavy sleeper? Do you talk in your sleep? Do you remember your dreams? Do you need an alarm clock to wake up?

  1. Hand out a copy of Zzz Worksheet and ask students to individually complete the table in Exercise 1.
  2. When the students have finished, ask them to mingle with other students and find those who can define for them the idioms they are unsure of or do not know.
  3. Check together as a class.
  4. When the students have finished, ask them to complete Exercise 2 individually.
  5. When they have finished, ask them to compare with a partner before checking together as a class.
  6. When the students have finished, put them into pairs or small groups of 3 and ask them to answer the questions in Exercise 2. Encourage the students to use the target language when they answer the questions.
  7. When the students have finished, ask them to share the most surprising answers they have heard.

Fast finishers:

  1. Ask students to choose 3 expressions that caught their attention and briefly answer the following question e.g. What would the world be like if…everyone woke up at the crack of dawn? What would the world be like if… everyone suddenly became a night owl?

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The proof is in the pudding

Would you rather…?

Introduction:

This is a free Would you rather…? printable board game for students to get to know each other better or/and to practise speaking for fluency. The game could be used at the beginning of each term/year, when a new student joins the class or as a starter or an activity at the end of the class.

Level: B1+

Time: 45 minutes

Objectives:

  1. To practise speaking for fluency whilst answering Would you rather…? questions.
  2. To learn new things about students’ classmates.

Materials:

  1. Printable Would you rather board game .
  2. One die per group of 2 or 3.
  3. One checker per player.

Procedure:

  1. Put the students in pairs, or groups of 3, and give them a copy of ‘Would you rather…?’ board game and a die.
  2. Players take it in turns to throw the die twice – the first throw indicates which column they should use, and the second throw indicates which row, to obtain the question.
  3. When a player lands on a square, they answer the question from that square. The player has to justify their answer and give examples.
  4. The game continues in the circle going left.
  5. At the end, ask the students to name three things they have strongly agreed on, or disagreed on, with their classmates.

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Let’s Get Better Acquainted 🙂

Decisions, decisions…!

P.S. Happy St Nicholas Day.