Double Decker

Introduction:

These are two board game activities to answer funny questions using past simple and present perfect. The games can be used together, or separately, depending on the objectives of the lesson.

Level: B1 +

Objectives:

  1. To practise answering When was the last time you…? and Have you ever…? questions.
  2. To develop speaking fluency, whilst revising regular and irregular verbs.
  3. To draw students’ attention to the difference between past simple and present perfect if two games are played in the same lesson.

Materials:

  1. 2 PDF Double Decker board games, one per pair or group of 3; a die per pair or group of 3.

Procedure:

  1. Put the students in pairs, or groups of 3, and give them a copy of one of the board games and a die. Aim to have two board games in use at the same time if you want to concentrate on explaining the differences between the tenses.
  2. Ask the students to look at the infinitives on their board games e.g. To hold a new born baby and in their groups ask them to change each verb into past simple and past participle e.g. to hold, held, held.
  3. Check as a class.
  4. Now players take it in turns to throw the die twice – the first throw indicates which column they should use, and the second throw indicates which row, to obtain the expression.
  5. The player must then ask their classmate a question using the expression on the given square e.g. When was the last time you held a newborn baby? Or Have you ever called someone by the wrong name? The other players answer the question and provide their partner, or other two group members, with as much detail as possible.
  6. The game continues in a circle going left.
  7. Swap the board games after sufficient time to allow two games to be played by each pair or group.
  8. At the end, ask the students to name some surprising and unexpected things they have learnt about their classmates.

Related posts:

Summary of past or recent events

Time to keep up with the times

Ir(regular) Xmas

Best birthday ever

Can you see the error of your ways?

Introduction:

This is an activity for lower intermediate students to review some of the most common mistakes they make. The students correct the mistakes individually, write sentences that are true for them and interview their partners.

Level: A2

Time: 45 minutes

Objectives:

  1. To identify and correct common mistakes made by lower intermediate students.
  2. To practice changing statements into questions.
  3. To develop fluency and confidence in speaking.

Materials:

  1. Can you see the error of your ways worksheet, one per student

Procedure:

  1. On the left hand side of the board, write I have 2 childrens. Explain the sentence is incorrect and in pairs, or groups of three, ask students to highlight the error and correct the sentence, e.g. I don’t have any children, I have 3 children, etc.
  2. When they have finished, ask them what the error was and underline it on the board. To the right of the sentence, ask them to write their correct sentences in a column on the board. Go through them together as a class and ask which statement is true for them – underline it on the board.
  3. Then, in their pairs, ask the students to change the statement from the first column into a question, e.g. Do you have any children? How many children do you have? Write on the board in a column to the right of the correct sentences.
  4. Clarify understanding and explain any incorrect suggestions.
  5. Give each student a Can you see the error of your ways… worksheet and individually ask students to circle the mistakes in sentences 1 to 12.
  6. When they have finished, they check the answers with a partner.
  7. Individually, students then write a correct sentence in the second column, making the statement true for them, as per the example.
  8. When they have finished, they check the answers with a partner.
  9. Individually, ask the students to change the statements from the first column into questions and write them down in the third column, as per the example.
  10. Monitor closely. When they have finished, they check the answers with a partner.
  11. Explain any mistakes on the board using the correct structures.
  12. Then, put students into pairs, or groups of three, and ask them to interview each other using the questions.
  13. If students need more practice, ask them to switch pairs / groups and repeat the process.

Fast finishers:

  1. Ask students to write down 4 things they have learned about their classmates.

Related posts:

Bid it 2 Win it FCE Sentence Auction

Bid it 2 Win it Sentence Auction

My favourite mistakes card game

P.S. Thank you Alex.

 

Hypothetically speaking

Introduction:

This is a short writing activity for intermediate students to revise the second conditional. The students answer the questions individually, read and match their classmate’s answers and further discuss the responses that caught their attention.

Level: B1

Time: 45 minutes

Objectives:

  1. To answer questions using the second conditional.
  2. To match their classmates’ responses to the questions.
  3. To discuss the questions that caught students’ attention using the second conditional.

Materials:

  1. Hypothetically speaking worksheet, one per student

Procedure:

  1. Give each student a Hypothetically speaking worksheet and ask them to answer the questions in random order, e.g. write the answer to question 1 next to letter d etc.
  2. Put students in pairs, or groups of 3, and ask them to swap papers. The students now read each other’s answers and match the responses to the questions. Encourage students to correct any mistakes they might come across when they go through their classmate’s sentences and ask them to underline the responses that catch their attention.
  3. Monitor throughout the activity.
  4. Now ask the students to swap the papers and check if their classmates matched the responses correctly.
  5. Elicit some answers from the students. When I did this activity for the first time I couldn’t believe how many original responses the students came up with.
  6. In the same pairs or groups of 3 now ask the students to explain in detail the underlined answers using the second conditional.

Fast finishers

  1. Ask students to take 4 of their responses and use them as beginnings of new sentences, e.g. If everyone in the world was madly in love with me, I would be over the moon. I would be over the moon, if I could speak English with an Irish accent.

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(Un)conditional love

 

How do you …?

Introduction:

This is a fun activity for intermediate students to practise some of the most common phrasal verbs. The students match the phrasal verbs to their definitions and do a speaking activity in which they answer questions beginning with “How do you…?”

Level: B1

Time: 45 minutes

Objectives:

  1. To familiarise students with some of the most common phrasal verbs in English.
  2. To match the phrasal verbs with their definitions.
  3. To answer How do you…? questions containing the new phrasal verbs.

Materials:

  1. How do you… worksheet, one per student

Procedure:

  1. Give each student a How do you…? worksheet and individually ask students to underline the phrasal verbs in questions 1 to 10. Check as a class.
  2. Now ask the students to match the phrasal verbs they have underlined to their definitions a-j.
  3. Check answers as a class.
  4. Put students into groups of three or four and ask them to look at questions 1 to 10 again.
  5. Student 1 reads the question to the other student(s), who must try and come up with the most outrageous/ crazy/ surprising/ funny etc. answer. The student whose answer most appeals to Student 1, and who manages to correctly incorporate the phrasal verb from the question into the answer, gets a point. Players take it in turns, or continue left if in a group of three or four. The game continues until all the questions have been answered.
  6. The student with the highest number of points wins.

Fast finishers:

  1. Ask students to choose 3 phrasal verbs and write their own How do you…? questions and then ask their partner to answer them.

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Hit the road

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P.S. Thank you Alex and Stu for being such great editors and playtesters.

 

What’s with all the questions?

IMG-20141231-WA0009

Introduction:

This is a fun board game activity to practise asking wh- questions and any other grammar points you would currently like to revise or practise with your students, e.g. Subject/object questions and present tenses, etc. Students ask and answer wh- questions about a variety of topics.

Level: A2+

Time: 45 minutes

Objectives:

  1. To practise asking wh- questions.
  2. To develop fluency and confidence in speaking.

Materials:

  1. What’s with all the questions PDF board game and one die per pair, or a small group of 3 or 4.

Procedure:

  1. Print the board game and put students in pairs or small groups of 3 or 4.
  2. Players take it in turns to throw the die and move the numbers thrown.
  3. To obtain a question for the speaking activity students throw the die twice. The first throw indicates which column they should use, and the second throw which row they should use to obtain the topic.
  4. Player 1 must then ask their partner or teammates at least 2 questions on the given topic, beginning with who, what, where, when, why and how, focusing on the recent language point studied, e.g. Where do you usually eat lunch? What do you have for breakfast? for present simple, or Where did you eat lunch when you were at school? What was your favourite food when you were a child? to practise past simple, etc. Increase the level of difficulty depending on the level of your class.
  5. The other player/s then answer the questions in as much detail as possible.
  6. The game continues in a circle going left.
  7. At the end, ask students to write down 4 additional questions for their classmates about a topic that sparked their interest the most.

Related posts:

Summary of past or recent events

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P.S. Do you think your students would enjoy this activity? I’d love to know your thoughts.

Bid it 2 Win it FCE Sentence Auction


Introduction:

This is a sentence auction activity for Spanish FCE students. Students work in groups and bid on the sentences they think they can correct. This activity could also be used with lower CAE groups.

Level: B2

Time: 45 minutes

Objectives:

  1. To review the most common mistakes made by Spanish FCE students in an entertaining way.

Materials:

  1. Bid it 2 Win it FCE Sentence Auction, one worksheet for the teacher.

Procedure:

  1. Put students in small groups of 2 or 3.
  2. Each group will have £2000 to spend.
  3. Bids begin at £50 and each subsequent bid is increased by £100.
  4. The teacher writes the first sentence on the board and sells it to the highest bidder.
  5. Once the students have bought the sentence they have to rewrite it. If their answer is correct they keep the sentence. If they are wrong the sentence goes back on sale and the students can bid on it again at the end.
  6. The winner of the game is the group which has ended up with the most correct sentences.

Related posts:

Bid it 2 Win it Sentence Auction

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