Single and ready to mingle

Introduction:

These are two activities to talk about dating. Students define the phrasal verbs and tell each other what emotions they associate with them and then do the speaking activity with their classmates.

Level: B1+

Time: 60 minutes

Objectives:

  1. To increase familiarity and correct use of phrasal verbs related to dating.
  2. To provide definitions of the phrasal verbs.
  3. To answer questions about dating using the phrasal verbs in question.

Materials:

  1. Single and ready to mingle Worksheet, one per student.
  2. Single and ready to mingle board game, one per pair or a group of three.

Procedure:

  1. Elicit the best places to find a date from students and write them on the board, e.g. online, at a bar, in a park, in a fitness club, etc., and in pairs ask them to briefly discuss what are the advantages and disadvantages of meeting a potential date in those places.
  2. Hand out a copy of ‘Single and ready to mingle’ Worksheet and ask students to individually complete the table in Exercise 1.
  3. When the students have finished, ask them to mingle with other students to compare and check their answers, and compare the emotions they associate with each verb, e.g. asking someone out fills me with a sense of dread.
  4. Check together as a class.
  5. Put the students in pairs, or groups of 3, and give them a copy of ‘Single and ready to mingle’ board game and a die.
  6. Players take it in turns to throw the die twice – the first throw indicates which column they should use, and the second throw indicates which row, to obtain the question.
  7. Both players must discuss the question in as much detail as possible.
  8. During the game the players must try and incorporate ALL the phrasal verbs into theirs answers.
  9. At the end, ask the students to name three things they have strongly agreed on, or disagreed on, with their classmates.

Fast finishers:

  1. Ask students to think of a single friend they have and write down a list of 5 dating tips for that particular person, e.g. they should be more open- minded and go out more.

Related posts:

Lovers’ tiff

MEOW!

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Introduction: 

This is an activity to introduce and practise animal idioms. Students describe 10 animals, complete the expressions with the missing adjectives and complete sentences about themselves.

Level: B2

Time: 45 minutes

Objectives:

  1. To increase familiarity and correct use of animal idioms.
  2. To complete the sentences in Exercise 2 with the missing adjectives.
  3. To complete sentences containing animal idioms individually.

Materials:

  1. MEOW! Worksheet, one per student.

Procedure:

  1. Elicit different animals from students and write them on the board, e.g. tiger, dog, donkey, etc. and in pairs ask them to think of the characteristic traits of these animals, e.g. as fierce as a tiger.
  2. Hand out a copy of MEOW!! Worksheet and ask students to individually complete Exercise 1.
  3. When they have finished, ask them to compare their answers in pairs and justify their choice if it is different from their partner’s.
  4. Students then complete Exercise 2 individually, before comparing their answers with their partner.
  5. Check together as a class.
  6. Students then complete Exercise 3 individually.
  7. When they have finished, students swap their sheets with their partner and read each other’s answers.
  8. When the students have finished, ask them to circle 4 new things they have found out about their classmate from Exercise 3.

Fast finishers:

  1. Ask students to write down the name of professions they associate with the expressions they have learnt, e.g. stubborn as a mule: English teacher, etc.

MEOW! Worksheet

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Mirror Mirror on the wall…

Wanted

P.S.  Nakotek. A little birdie told me it was your birthday today. Have an amazing day.

Lovely day, innit?

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Introduction:

This is an activity to introduce and practise idioms related to weather. Students first divide the expressions into 3 categories, then complete the sentences with the missing idioms and finally, do the speaking activity with their classmates.

Level: B2

Time: 60 minutes

Objectives:

  1. To increase familiarity and correct use of weather idioms.
  2. To complete the sentences in Exercise 2 with the missing weather idioms.
  3. To answer questions containing the weather idioms in pairs.

Materials:

  1. Lovely day, innit? Worksheet 1, one per student.
  2. Lovely day, innit? Worksheet 2 cut up, one per pair or a group of three.

Procedure:

  1. Elicit different weather types from students and write them on the board, e.g. hot, rainy, sunny, cloudy, humid, foggy, etc. and in pairs ask them to discuss which types of weather they prefer and how each type makes them feel, e.g. When it’s foggy, I feel drained and sleepy.
  2. Hand out a copy of Lovely day, innit? Worksheet 1 and ask students to individually complete the table in Exercise 1.
  3. When the students have finished, ask them to mingle with other students and find those who can define for them the idioms they are unsure of or do not know.
  4. Check together as a class.
  5. When the students have finished, ask them to complete Exercise 2 individually.
  6. When they have finished, ask them to compare and discuss with a partner before checking together as a class.
  7. When the students have finished, put them into pairs or small groups of 3 and give them a full set of the cut up questions from Lovely day, innit? Worksheet 2.
  8. Students answer the questions in pairs.
  9. When the students have finished, ask them to share the most surprising answers they have heard.

Fast finishers:

Ask students to discuss a film they have seen recently, or their favourite film, using as many of the idioms as possible to describe the plot, the characters, etc.

Lovely day, innit Worksheet 1

Lovely day, innit Worksheet 2

Answers

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Clothes do (not) make the man

You talkin’ to me?

Decisions, decisions…!

Triple Treat

Introduction:

These are three board game activities to talk about families, education and free time. They can be used together or separately, and are a great way to help students practise speaking and develop fluency, as well as prepare for Part 1 of the FCE /CAE speaking exam.

Level: B1 +

Objectives:

  1. To practise speaking about families, education and free time.
  2. To develop fluency under timed conditions.

Materials:

3 PDF board games, one per pair or group of 3; a die and a timer per pair or group of 3.

Procedure:

  1. Put the students in pairs or groups of 3 and give them a copy of one of the board games and a die, they can use their phones for the timer. Aim to have all three board games in use at the same time.
  2. Players take it in turns to throw the die twice – the first throw indicates which column they should use, and the second throw indicates which row, to obtain the question.
  3. The player must then speak for at least 1 minute on that topic and provide their partner, or other two group members, with as much detail as possible.
  4. The game continues in a circle going left.
  5. Swap the board games after sufficient time to allow all three games to be played by each pair or group.
  6. At the end, ask the students to name three new things they have learnt about their classmates.

Triple treat

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Let’s Get Better Acquainted 🙂

Are you bored or just boring?

Ask a Q board game

 

Clothes do (not) make the man

Introduction:

This is an activity to introduce and practise clothes idioms. Students complete the sentences with the missing items of clothing and later interview their classmates.

Level: B2

Time: 45 minutes

Objectives:

  1. To present students with clothes idioms.
  2. To complete the sentences in Exercise 1 with the missing items of clothing.
  3. To interview other classmates and write down the reasons why they agree or disagree with the statements in Exercise 1.

Materials:

  1. Clothes do (not) make the man Worksheet, one per student.

Procedure:

  1. Write the statement Clothes don’t make the man on the board and ask students to tell their partner if they agree or disagree with it.
  2. Hand out a copy of Clothes do (not) make the man Worksheet and ask students to individually complete the sentences in Exercise 1.
  3. When the students have finished, ask them to compare in small groups and then check together as a class.
  4. Clarify meaning if necessary.
  5. In pairs, or small groups of 3, ask the students to interview each other (Exercise 2) and write down the reasons why their classmates agree or disagree with the statements they have just completed (Exercise 1).
  6. Once they have discussed 2 statements with their current partner(s), change the groups and continue until the students have completed the table in Exercise 2.
  7. When the students have finished, ask them to share the most well presented arguments they have heard.

Fast finishers:

  1. Ask students to choose 5 clothes idioms and think of situations in their life that could be described using those idioms, e.g. since losing my weekend job, I have had to tighten my belt; If I don’t pull my socks up, I won’t pass the exam at the end of term.

Clothes do (not) make the man Worksheet

Flying the nest

Introduction:

This is an activity for intermediate students to review vocabulary related to ‘household chores’. Students divide the chores into three categories, come up with a cleaning schedule in a house they have just moved into and write a short advert for a new housemate. They seem to need help with the bills. ☺

Level: B1+

Time: 45 minutes

Objectives:

  1. To review vocabulary related to household chores.
  2. To come up with an effective cleaning schedule.
  3. To write a short advertisement for a new housemate.

Materials:

  1. Flying the Nest Worksheet – one per student.

Procedure:

  1. Write the names of various rooms on the board, such as kitchen, bathroom, bedroom, etc. In pairs, ask the students to name two chores they perform in each of those areas of the house; monitor, and when they have some suggestions, nominate students to write them on the board by the room names. Clarify meaning and check spelling.
  2. Hand each student a Flying the Nest Worksheet and ask them, individually, to separate the household chores into 3 separate categories (Exercise 1).
  3. When the students have finished, they compare their tables with their partner’s and explain their choices.
  4. In their pairs, ask them to think about what they find most difficult when sharing a flat/house with other people, such as their parents, a partner, friends, a housemate, e.g. having a curfew, finding dirty dishes in the sink, etc.
  5. Put students in small groups of three and tell them they have just moved into a beautiful new house with a garden and they are now sitting in the kitchen, trying to decide how to divide the chores (Exercise 2). They must negotiate with their housemates and try to agree only to do chores they like or don’t mind doing around the house. Encourage negotiation and compromise.
  6. When the students have reached an agreement, ask them to compare their cleaning schedule with the other groups.
  7. In the same groups, students now move on to Exercise 3. They must write a short description of an ideal new housemate.
  8. When the students have finished, ask them to read their description to the other groups.

Fast finishers:

  1. Ask students to choose 8 chores from the list and decide how much they think it would cost in their country to have them done, e.g. your shirts ironed, your windows cleaned, etc.

Flying the Nest Worksheet

The Good Ol’ Days

Introduction:

This is a great activity I’ve taken part in at acting classes. It allows intermediate students to practise used to in a really entertaining way.

Level:  B 1

Time: 1h

Objectives:

  1. To write a short dialogue about students’ past habits using used to.
  2. To act out another pair’s dialogue.

Procedure:

  1. In pairs, ask students about some of the activities they used to do regularly when they were younger, e.g. in primary school, they used to go the beach every summer and they used to go round their friends’ house every weekend, etc.
  2. In the same pairs, students must imagine they are two childhood friends who have just bumped into each other and start talking about all the fun things they did together when they were younger.
  3. In pairs, students write a dialogue between the two friends giving specific examples of the things they did using the USED TO structure, e.g. Student A: Do you remember when we used to go to that body blitz dancing class? We used to have so much fun trying to follow the teacher’s instructions. She used to get very annoyed if I made a mistake and used to tell me to repeat the steps over and over again. Student B: Yes! That was so much fun. I used to be really scared of her. Oh, and do you remember when after class we always used to get fish and chips, we were so hungry. We used to sit on the grass, eat and just chat for hours.
  4. Once the students have described at least 5 activities that they used to do together, ask the first two pairs to sit in front of the whole class. Try to create some space for students to perform this next activity.
  5. Ask the first pair (Student A and B) to read out the dialogue. While they read, the second pair (Student A and B) must listen carefully and act out all the actions the first pair describe (Student A from the second pair acts out the actions mentioned by Student A in the first pair, Student B from the second pair acts out the actions mentioned by Student B in the first pair).
  6. Encourage the other students to pay close attention to both pairs and check that all the actions have been “correctly“acted out.
  7. Continue until all the pairs have read their dialogues and have had a chance to act out another pair’s dialogue.

P.S. Thank you again for all your help Alex.