Summary of past or recent events

Introduction:

This is a speaking activity which allows students to describe the most important things that happened to them in 2016, over the holidays, the last school year etc.

Objectives:

  1. To describe past events using past tenses or recent events using present perfect tenses.
  2. To practise asking wh-questions in authentic communication.

Procedure:

  1. Ask students to write down ten important or memorable things that happened to them in the chosen time period. Make sure they know the events will be discussed in class and are not too personal. You can decrease or increase that number depending on how talkative your class is (I found teenagers usually struggle with ten).
  2. Put students in pairs (student A and student B) or groups of three.
  3. Student A briefly describes the first event on the list. Once student A has finished student B asks additional questions starting with who, whose, what, when, where, why, which, how, how long and how many.
  4. Encourage students to show pictures of the events, if they have any on their phones, to make the activity more relevant.
  5. Students continue until they have each described all the events from their lists.

Alternative ideas:

  1. You could also ask students to come up with a recent summary of events in politics, art, science, etc.
  2. You could use it as a getting- to- know- you activity with students writing a list of “Ten things to know about me “.

Related posts:

Best birthday ever

Time to keep up with the times

Ir(regular) Xmas

Soap Opera

Ask a Q board game

Introduction:

This is a free printable board game to practise adjectives followed by prepositions and improve fluency under time pressure.

Objective:

The objective of the game is to reach the end by moving across the board whilst asking and answering questions.

Materials:

Printable ASK a Q board game, a die, one checker per player and a countdown timer.

How to play:

  1. Ask a Q is played by 2 to 4 players.
  2. Players take it in turns to throw the die and move the number thrown.
  3. When a player lands on a square they ask the student on their right the question from that square. The student has to speak for at least 45 seconds without excessive repetition, and must answer the question using the adjective and the preposition in bold. If the player repeats or pauses for too long, the timer is restarted and they must start their answer again. After completing the task, they then roll the die and ask the question to the student on their right.
  4. The winner is the first player to land on the last square.

Note: The adjectives and prepositions are in bold to encourage noticing.

ask-a-q-printable-board-game

Related posts:

When & where board game

Compare & contrast board game

Time to keep up with the times

When & where board game

Introduction:

This is a free printable board game to review prepositions of time and place.

Objective:

The objective of the game is to move across the board and reach the end with the highest number of points; points are given for correct use of the prepositions in, at or on.

Materials:

Printable board game, dice and some checkers.

How to play:

  1. When & where is played by 2 to 4 players.
  2. Players take it in turns to throw the dice and move the number thrown.
  3. When the players land on the squares they must create two sentences with the expressions on the square. The players get one point for each correct sentence e.g. if the player rolls a 3 they move 3 spaces on the blue board and think of sentences with the words given : I would love to travel to India in the future, I was at a boring meeting last night. They score 2 points and the next player rolls the dice.
  4. If the player makes a mistake they don’t receive a point for that sentence.
  5. Other players can receive extra points if they spot and correct the other player’s mistake, which encourages peer correction.
  6. The winner is the player who lands on the last square with the highest number of points for correct sentences.

when-where-printable-board-game

P.S. Thank you Alex for your support and constant motivation.

P.S. Thank you Stu for your incredible attention to detail. Feedback taken on board 🙂

Related posts:

Time to keep up with the times

Ask a Q board game

Compare & contrast board game